law courts

Document setting out the UK Government's approach to tackling violence against women and girls. It is an approach which moves beyond just the criminal justice system and includes roles for all relevant public sector organisations such as central government departments, local government and the voluntary sector.

This resource is a review which looks specifically at problems with the implementation of the Human Rights Act. The review was commissioned in the immediate aftermath of the Inquiry Report (by HM Chief Inspector of Probation) into the release of Anthony Rice, which had suggested that human rights arguments, and the Human Rights Act, had been contributory factors in the events leading to the murder of Naomi Bryant.

This Act of Scottish Parliament has two main purposes. These are to prevent the accused in a sexual offence case from personally cross-examining the complainer; and to strengthen the existing provisions restricting the extent to which evidence can be led regarding the character and sexual history of the complainer. The first purpose will be achieved by requiring the accused to be legally represented throughout his or her trial.

This Act of Scottish Parliament covers intermediate diets and how they relate to arrest warrants. An intermediate diet is a hearing set by a court, in summary criminal proceedings, for the purpose of ascertaining, so far as is reasonably practicable, whether the case is likely to proceed to trial on the date assigned as a trial diet. If an accused does not appear as required for an intermediate diet, the court may grant a warrant for his or her arrest.

Report of the Bradley Inquiry into the extent to which offenders with mental health problems or learning disabilities in England could be diverted from prison to other services and the obstacles to such diversion. The report makes recommendations on the organisation of effective court liaison and diversion arrangements and the services required to support them.

Scottish Government statistical bulletin providing information on activity relating to community penalties in Scotland garnered from local authority social work management information systems.

In 2004 the NSPCC and Victim Support described the experiences of 50 young witnesses in their report In Their Own Words. The report concluded that, despite a raft of policies and procedures intended to facilitate children's evidence, their experiences revealed an implementation gap between policy and delivery. This is the executive summary of a study that considers whether the implementation gap has narrowed since 2004.

Document from Victim Support in Scotland setting out in detail their strategy for putting the needs of victims and witnesses at the heart of the justice system and the actions and policies they will pursue to achieve this outcome.

Document reporting progress made towards four goals in the effort to tackle domestic violence, namely to increase the early identification of and intervention with victims, to increase the capacity of the domestic violence sector to provide help and support, improve the criminal justice response and support victims through the criminal justice system.