direct payments

This resource is a practical tool for learning disability partnership boards and others working to support older family carers and their relative with a learning disability – referred to here as older families – to bring about positive changes in their lives. It should enable boards to measure what they are doing, how well they are doing it and to decide what they need to do next.

Briefing paper explaining many of the key features of self-directed support such as direct payments and individual budgets.

Report using carers' experiences to assess the effectiveness and value of the direct payments system and make recommendations for improvements.

Report of a study which looked into the experiences, views and attitudes of older family carers who are living with and caring for adult relatives with learning disabilities with a view to finding out how local services can be more responsive to this group.

Discussion paper addressing the question of whether community-based services can deliver better results for black and minority ethnic (BME) service users by explaining the latest direct payments legislation and how it is supposed to work, summarising research evidence which indicates an inability of BME service users to embrace direct payments fully and asks questions which could make direct payments more effective for BME service users.

Paper examining the ways in which personal budgets will affect the social and health care market. It considers what prospective budget holders know and think about personal budgets, how they would spend it and what difficulties they foresee. It also suggests the likely challenges local authorities and other providers will face in delivering the personalisation agenda and makes recommendations on how to make the transition successfully.

This evidence cluster details 1) what is known about take up of Direct Payments amongst mental health service users and 2) the key factors for successful implementation of Direct Payments for this group. The experiences of service users are reported throughout.

The Alzheimer's Society is the UK's leading care and research charity for people with dementia, their families and carers. They produce information and advice sheets to support those affected by dementia. This information sheet explains that if a person is confused or has dementia and needs support, their local authority social services department should carry out a community care assessment. If this assessment shows that the person needs certain services, the local authority has a duty to ensure that these services are provided.

'All in a day's work' is suitable as a summative assessment on practising social work law. This learning object will: help users to reflect on what approach, or combination of strategies, they adopt to being a social work law practitioner and will enable users to undertake an assessment of their social work law knowledge. 'All in a day's work' presents a series of tricky situations.