homelessness

Scottish housing digest: housing policy at your fingertips

Report providing a broad overview of major developments in housing and related policy areas in Scotland and across the rest of the UK.

Review of section 5 of the Housing (Scotland) Act 2001

The research examined the use of Section 5 of the Housing (Scotland) Act 2001 and other routes through which local authorities assist statutorily homeless households in securing permanent accommodation from a Registered Social landlord (RSL).

Section 5 gives local authorities the power to require RSLs operating in their area to provide accommodation for homeless households.

The research has been undertaken by Craigforth for the Scottish Government and is to be used by the Government to inform their review of policy and guidance in this area.

Refuge for young runaways in the UK: a critical overview

This report deals with the concept of 'refuge' for children under the age of sixteen who are away from home or care, as established under section 51 of the Children's Act 1989 and section 38 of The Children's (Scotland) Act 1995. It discusses the factors affecting its provision in the UK and goes on to detail a series of pilot programmes, run between 2004-2006. These were funded by the Department of Health and the Department for Education and Skills, aimed to extend the models of community-based refuge.

Include me in : how life skills help homeless people back into work

Paper putting forward a model for closing the gap between improved outcomes in the short term and laying sustainable foundations for social inclusion over the long term. It suggests connecting people with wider opportunities to find and keep work as a means of enabling people to maintain integration after an initial success in escaping homelessness.

Engaging young homeless people: Crisis' experience of being involved in the v programme

Report describing the evolution of a one-year programme to provide volunteering opportunities for 52 homeless young people in London and Newcastle and offering tips to other organisations on the best way to set up and develop similar projects.

Taking forward the Government economic strategy : tackling poverty, inequality and deprivation in Scotland

Response of the Scottish Homelessness and Employability Network to the Scottish Government discussion paper of June 2008 on their policies to reduce poverty in Scotland.

Housing, health, social care: an introduction

Briefing paper intended to inform housing professionals of the key priorities and emerging challenges confronting housing, health and care services in Scotland.

On the outside : continuity of care for people leaving prison

Report presenting the findings of a study which investigated the continuity of care experienced by prisoners before and after release. It also makes recommendations as to how continuity of care between prison and the community could be improved.

Recognising and addressing homophobic and transphobic harassment: a guide for social housing providers and homelessness services

This guidance has been produced by the Scottish Housing Regulator in partnership with Stonewall Scotland and the LGBT Centre for Health and Wellbeing. This guidance is designed to assist social landlords concerned with addressing homophobic and transphobic harassment. It provides an overview of the relevant legislation, describes homophobia and transphobia, identifies the behaviour involved in harassment, highlights certain aspects of service delivery, and offers practical guidance to assist in reviewing harassment policy and procedures.

The limits of primary care

This resource is one of the units on the Open University's OpenLearn website, which provides free and open educational resources for learners and educators around the world. This unit explores questions of access to community services, using a fictionalised case study of two long-term heroin addicts to illustrate practical questions, about how services can be accessed, and moral questions, about entitlement to resources when their problems can be regarded as at least in part self-inflicted.