deafness

Website of Deafway, a charity organisation that provides residential services, youth services, premises for deaf clubs and BSL (British Sign Language), and other services to deaf people.

Listening to children is an integral part of understanding what they are feeling and what it is they need from their early years experience. Understanding listening in this way is key to providing an environment in which all children feel confident, safe and powerful, ensuring they have the time and space to express themselves in whatever form suits them. This resource refers to listeners as adults and looks specifically at listening to babies.

Study looking at the state and complexities of linguistic access to education for deaf pupils and students in Scotland. It describes work which aims to improve linguistic access in education and makes recommendations to improve linguistic access throughout all education sectors.

This conference report examines the issues relating to making advocacy more accessible for everyone. Specifically, the report looks at what can be done to promote diversity and inclusion, the importance of advocacy for people with dementia, what children and young people want from advocacy, and the advocacy needs of deaf, deafblind and hard of hearing people.

This resource is the report of an event organised by the Advocacy Safeguards Agency in collaboration with the Scottish Council on Deafness, the British Deaf Association, the National Deaf Children’s Society, Deaf Children’s Society for East of Scotland and AdvoCard. It looks at the advocacy needs of the deaf community.

This study used five in depth case studies using documentary analysis, interviews and structured case response methods. The study aimed to consider the impact of the move towards integrated children's service arrangements on how social care services for deaf children and their families are delivered and whether these arrangements create opportunities or threats to identify, assess and meet social care needs. Although good practice was identified, there were concerns about the quality, availability and appropriateness of social care services.

This report has been produced jointly by HM Inspectorate of Education (HMIE) and the National Deaf Children’s Society (NDCS). The aim of the publication is to report on the quality of education currently experienced by deaf children in Scottish schools, to provide examples of good practice and to identify signposts for improvement which schools can use when planning for excellence.

This paper outlines the key findings from a study which examined the community care and mental health needs of, and current service provision for, sensory impaired adults in Scotland. The study involved a literature review, a mapping exercise of existing services, and consultation with service planners and providers and with service users and their carers. The research focussed on Deaf, deafened, blind, partially sighted and dual sensory impaired adults.

This resource starts with a quiz and a short case study to help the user understand the complexities of defining and identifying impairment as well as the difficulties faced by people who have these impairments. Then it will be able to explore four different scenarios which present tips on working with particular communication needs of service users.

Four Radio 4 programmes in a series about the health and wellbeing of the seven ages of humanity. These four programmes explore life experiences and issues for people in their sixties and seventies.

The first programme looks at memory loss, the second discusses chronic conditions such as osteo-arthritis and the inability to hear, the third examines retirement, and the final programme looks at how medicine can fix some of the physical problems of old age.