community health care

This study examines a joint NHS-Local Authority initiative providing a dedicated nursing and physiotherapy team to three residential care homes in Bath and North East Somerset. The initiative aims to meet the nursing needs of residents where they live and to train care home staff in basic nursing.

One of a series of six transforming community service best practice guides for frontline staff and their leaders which aim to help to deliver High Quality Care for all: the Next Sate Review. Each guide has a similar framework, clearly setting out ambitions, taking action to deliver, using best available evidence and demonstrating and measuring achievement.

One of a series of six transforming community service best practice guides for frontline staff and their leaders which aim to help to deliver High Quality Care for all: the Next Sate Review. Each guide has a similar framework, clearly setting out ambitions, taking action to deliver, using best available evidence and demonstrating and measuring achievement. The guides highlight what is considered to be good practice across community services.

Report of a study which examined the nature and provision of care by nurses and allied health professionals to children and young people with complex needs across Scotland.

Information was gathered from workforce development plans and a survey of practitioners to build up a picture of where children and young people receive care, the knowledge and skills required to provide that care and the challenges facing services.

Report of a research project which evaluated the development of Community Health and Care Partnerships (CHCPs) as a means of delivering health and social care services in Glasgow City. East CHCP was used as a case study and attention was particularly focused on the clarity and acceptance of partnership working, the nature and development of inter-agency trust and the ways in which organisational/professional identity was changing in view of the unified CHCP structure.

The aims of this study are: to systematically identify existing published research on singing, wellbeing and health; to map this research in terms of the forms of singing investigated, designs and methods employed and participants involved: to critically appraise this body of research, and where possible synthesise findings to draw general conclusions about the possible benefits of singing for health. The hypothesis underpinning this review is that singing, and particularly group singing, has a positive impact on personal wellbeing and physical health.