health and health care

This report begins by asking why there should be investment in promotion and prevention. It then summarises what is known and gives examples of study findings on wellbeing, early intervention,, depression, suicide and workplace health promotion. Ongoing and future evaluations are noted and the need for more European assessments emphasised.

This briefing presents the findings from a review of the impact of parental separation and divorce on children’s well-being and development. The review incorporated evidence concerning family breakdown and its consequences, and included research relating to both married and cohabiting parents. Findings are summarised in the areas of: family breakdown and its impact on children; contributory factors and optimising positive outcomes.

From April 2009, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) will be the new independent regulator of health and adult social care services across England. This policy sets out how the CQC intend to use their enforcement powers to protect the health, safety and welfare of people who use health and social care services, and to improve the quality of these services.

The National Offender Management Service is subject to the requirements of the Disability Discrimination Act. This thematic report draws together information from prisoner surveys and inspection reports between 2006 and 2008, together with responses from 82 prison disability liaison officers (DLOs), to examine how well prisons are currently able to discharge these duties. Areas covered include: environment and relationships; safety; health services; activities; and resettlement. The report makes a number of recommendations.

The purpose of this guidance is to describe and clarify good practice in health facilitation and health action planning and support localities to make progress on this and on reducing health inequalities experienced by people with learning disabilities. It builds on previous DH guidance and reflects the learning that has taken place since 2002 along with key recommendations of relevant recent reports and research. Short examples of good practice are included throughout.

An introduction gives the history of how in most European countries for many decades large institutions dominated provision for people with severe and chronic disabilities, including those with mental health problems, and how this changed. Trends in the balance of care, changes in provision, and policies to develop community care and the allocation of resources are described, challenges listed and opportunities outlined, ending with a conclusion that research on progress in this area in Europe has been limited.

Dignity in Care is a campaign being run by the Department of Health's website in the UK. It "aims to eliminate tolerance of indignity in health and social care services through raising awareness and inspiring people to take action." The focus of the campaign has mainly been on older people but has now been extended to include people with mental health needs. The website provides further information on the different aspects of the campaign, including relevant publications.

The background and aims of the map topic are discussed followed by an explanation of the methodology behind the systematic mapping. The report then focuses on the flow of literature found in the map and the main results. Finally, there is a discussion of the findings and wider implications of the map for carrying out systematic reviews and various types of other work.'

In general, the pain relief needs of older people with dementia are not adequately met. The aim of this research was to determine whether the same unsatisfactory treatment also applies to people with learning difficulties who have dementia and, if so, to make recommendations for improving practice. The research team was based at the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships, University of Edinburgh, and the Dementia Services Development Centre, University of Stirling.

The Capability Framework defines a common set of capabilities for nurses built around five key areas: Practising Ethically, Knowledge for Practice, Leadership for Practice, Multi-Professional Approach, Care Delivery & Intervention, it will help the development of educational programmes to ensure that LACNs are fully competent and capable to meet the challenges they face. It has been developed by NHS Education for Scotland (NES) and the Scottish Government Health Directorate.