health and health care

Children and young people are entitled to be involved in making choices and decisions when it comes to using healthcare services. However, not all children and young people are aware of their rights and responsibilities in these settings. This resource pack has been designed to enable you to help children and young people address this. It provides a structured approach to discussing healthcare services and healthcare rights with children and young people.

Knowledge reviews pull together knowledge from research, practice and people who use services. They describe what knowledge is available, highlight the evidence that has emerged and draw practice points from the evidence. Topics include residential child care, adult mental health services, improving social and health care services, social work education and looked-after children.

Short reviews of research evidence, each answering a key question related to an aspect of current health and social care practice for adults. In answering the question authors summarise the available evidence and detail the key implications for practice.

This report presents findings of a qualitative research project commissioned by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) to investigate the relationship between mental health and employment. The research was conducted during 2007 by the Social Policy Research Unit at the University of York and the Institute for Employment Studies.

Any new settlement on long-term care and support must address the apportionment of responsibility for its delivery as well as its funding. With the state's capacity limited and family input likely to decline, the wider community must expect to play a growing role. This offers an opportunity to end social care's marginalisation, argues David Brindle.

A survey of 1,496 parents and carers was carried out between August and October 2008 to quantify the reach (i.e. awareness and usage) of Sure Start Children’s Centres among the target population (that is, parents and carers of children aged under five years and expectant parents). The survey was limited to children’s centres which were designated by March 2006 and so had been established for several years.

This research shows what effect policies introduced since 1997 have had on reducing poverty and inequality. It offers a considered assessment of impacts over a decade. The study covers a range of subjects, including public attitudes to poverty and inequality, children and early years, education, health, employment, pensions, and migrants. It measures the extent of progress and also considers future direction and pressures, particularly in the light of recession and an ageing society.