health and health care

This qualitative study explored mainstream parent-practitioner consultations and the influence of personal experience and diversity factors. The research examined the perspectives of 54 practitioners working within education, health and social care.

This DVD asks viewers to consider their physical health, mental health and aspects of their life style that contribute in good or bad ways to both of these. It advocates regular physical health checks and the creation of a personal health action plan as part of a personalised and joined up service. It also describes the role of 'health facilitators', who can be friends, relatives or another trusted individual, to act as a broker between health services and a person with learning disabilities.

The Healthy Care Programme is funded by the Department for Education and Skills and developed by the National Children’s Bureau. It is a practical means of improving the health and well-being of looked after children and young people in line with the Department of Health Guidance Promoting the Health of Looked After Children (2002) and the Change for Children Programme.

The term ‘co-production’ is increasingly being applied to new types of public service delivery in the UK, including new approaches to adult social care. This briefing explains how staff should be encouraged to access co-productive initiatives, recognising and supporting diversity among the people who use services. And the importance of creating new structures, regulatory and commissioning practices and financial streams is necessary to embed co-production as a long-term rather than ad hoc solution.

Literature review published by the Scottish Government which draws together existing knowledge on assessing and evaluating parenting interventions. In conducting the literature review, the research team was interested in re-examining the historical policy context to locate the rationale for the introduction of Parenting Orders and the apparent under use of the provisions and the evidence of risk and protective factors and the interrelated issues of antisocial behaviour and child care, alongside effective approaches to family service provision.

This Act of Scottish Parliament is in four parts. Part 1 covers Community Care, which includes charging and not charging for social care, accommodation, direct payments and carers. Part 2 looks at Joint Working and relationships between NHS bodies and local authorities. Part 3 relates to Health, specifically Health Boards' Lists. Part 4 is a General section outlining regulations, guidance and directions.

Child wellbeing and child poverty:where the UK stands in the European table, is a briefing paper of research by a York University team for the Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) published in April 2009. This league table of young people's wellbeing places the United Kingdom 24th out of 29 countries measured across seven areas: health, education, housing, material resources, relationships, risk, and how young people feel about their lives. The data was mostly drawn from 2006 and does not reflect changes as a result of government programmes since that time.

The background and policy framework is explained. Offenders' problems gaining access to adequate health and social care services are outlined. Sections then discuss understanding offenders' needs, removing barriers to access, engaging with offenders and training and developing the workforce.

This research project, commissioned by the Scottish Government, looks at how advocacy for children in the Children's Hearings System compares with arrangements in other UK systems of child welfare and youth justice and those internationally, and what children and young people and the professionals who work with them think about advocacy arrangements in the Children's Hearings System and how these can be improved.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is a longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond. Funded by the Scottish Executive Education Department, its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.