substance misuse

Drug misuse and dependence : UK guidelines on clinical management

This resource is intended for all clinicians, especially those providing pharmacological interventions for drug misusers as a component of drug misuse treatment. The report discusses the effectiveness of drug treatment, the impact of drug misuse on families and communities, psychosocial components of treatment, health considerations including preventing drug-related death and blood-borne infections and considered specific treatment situations and populations such as mental health, criminal justice, pregnancy, young people and prisons.

Young people and substance use : the influence of personal, social and environmental factors on substance use among adolescents in Scotland

Report presenting the findings of a study which aimed to provide a holistic understanding of substance use behaviour among young people in Scotland and identify the key factors which influence alcohol, tobacco and drug use among this group. The report sets out to inform the development of relevant educational programmes and materials for use within schools.

Looking beyond risk. Parental substance misuse: scoping policy

Parental substance misuse can result in a considerable number of negative effects on the family. However, it is incredibly hard to calculate how many children and other family members might be affected. There is also growing evidence that some children appear to be more resilient than others to the negative impact of parental substance misuse. There is a need to investigate how these general statements relate to parental substance misuse across Scotland, a topic that has been given priority status by the Scottish Executive, and other key organisations.

Disabled parents : examining research assumptions

This review seeks to bring a somewhat hidden issue into the light, examining it and considering how the knowledge identified here might influence the future direction of services. Parenting as such has, rightly, gained increasing prominence over the last few years – but the parenting support needs of disabled parents have been largely ignored. This review was developed with two aims in mind. First, to bring together the research literature on disabled parents and, second, to set that research within the context of the policy and practice thinking of its time.

The Scottish Government's response to essential care: a report on the approach required to maximise opportunity for recovery from problem substance misuse in Scotland

This report gives the Scottish Government's response to the Scottish Advisory Committee on Drug Misuse-Essential Care Working Group Report 'Essential Care: a report on the approach required to maximise opportunity for recovery from problem substance misuse in Scotland'.

This response addresses each of the 15 recommendations, outlining both current and planned action by the Government and its delivery partners.

Drugs in the family : the impact on parents and siblings : full report

This report is about the ways in which problem drug use affects the family from the point of view of parents and siblings. It is about the difficulties that families confront in trying to respond to, and cope with, the changes that drug problems bring about for sons and daughters, brothers and sisters. Also, when drugs come into the family there is the danger that other siblings might become involved in problem drug use, further adding to family problems.

Hidden harm: Scottish Executive response to the report of the inquiry by the Advisory Council on the misuse of drugs

The Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs published 'Hidden Harm' which highlighted the plight of the estimated 41,000-59,000 children in Scotland affected by parental drug use. This resource describes the Scottish Executive's response to the challenges outlined in 'Hidden Harm'.

Hidden harm: responding to the needs of children of problem drug users

In this ground-breaking report, the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs considers the impact on children of parental problem drug use. For the first time ever, it assesses the number of affected children in the UK.

It examines the evidence for significant harm to their health and well-being. It considers what is being done at present to help them and what more could be done.