substance misuse

This report created by Joseph Rowntree Foundation (JRF) provides clear insights into the difficult lives of many vulnerable young people, dealing with parents who misuse drugs and alcohol. The report calls for young people to be involved in debate about the type of support they need and value to enable them to cope better.

This resource is intended for all clinicians, especially those providing pharmacological interventions for drug misusers as a component of drug misuse treatment. The report discusses the effectiveness of drug treatment, the impact of drug misuse on families and communities, psychosocial components of treatment, health considerations including preventing drug-related death and blood-borne infections and considered specific treatment situations and populations such as mental health, criminal justice, pregnancy, young people and prisons.

A growing number of children are affected by parental substance misuse, and policy and practice increasingly recognise the need to tackle the problems that this causes. Currently, the needs of older children are less well known or addressed. This study explores the experiences of 38 young people, aged 15–27 years, who had at least one parent with a drug or alcohol problem.

In many European countries, one or more general population surveys have been carried out to get an impression of the characteristics of illicit drug use at national level. Despite valuable efforts to standardise national drug surveys among the general populations in European Member States and to enhance cross-national comparability, national drug surveys still use different instruments, reporting formats and methodologies.

Report presenting the findings of a study which aimed to provide a holistic understanding of substance use behaviour among young people in Scotland and identify the key factors which influence alcohol, tobacco and drug use among this group. The report sets out to inform the development of relevant educational programmes and materials for use within schools.

Parental substance misuse can result in a considerable number of negative effects on the family. However, it is incredibly hard to calculate how many children and other family members might be affected. There is also growing evidence that some children appear to be more resilient than others to the negative impact of parental substance misuse. There is a need to investigate how these general statements relate to parental substance misuse across Scotland, a topic that has been given priority status by the Scottish Executive, and other key organisations.

This review seeks to bring a somewhat hidden issue into the light, examining it and considering how the knowledge identified here might influence the future direction of services. Parenting as such has, rightly, gained increasing prominence over the last few years – but the parenting support needs of disabled parents have been largely ignored. This review was developed with two aims in mind. First, to bring together the research literature on disabled parents and, second, to set that research within the context of the policy and practice thinking of its time.

This report presents a number of contributions that relate to analysing communal wastewaters for drugs and their metabolic products in order to estimate their consumption in the community. This area of work is developing in a multidisciplinary fashion, involving scientists working in different research areas. For this reason, the contributions to this publication come from a variety of different perspectives including: analytical chemistry, physiology and biochemistry, sewage engineering, spatial epidemiology and statistics, and conventional drug epidemiology.

Substance Misuse Management in General Practice (SMMGP) is a developing network to support GPs and other members of the primary health care team who work with substance misuse in the UK. The project team produces the Substance Misuse Management in General Practice newsletter (Network), and organises the annual conference 'Managing Drug Users in General Practice'.

An examination of the domestic cultivation of cannabis in England and Wales. This report examines the domestic cultivation of cannabis in England and Wales. Traditionally cannabis has been imported into the country by drug traffickers, but the extent of home cultivation has grown rapidly over the past decade, and home growing now accounts for a significant amount of cannabis consumed in this country.