substance misuse

First in a series of guides on developing and implementing Integrated Care Pathways (ICPs). While ICPs have been developed within health settings, there is a growing interest in their development across a range of treatment and social care settings to ensure that a co-ordinated, quality service is provided over the full continuum of care. Care pathways are designed to minimise delays, make best use of resources, and maximise quality of care.

This guide examines when and how integrated care pathways can be used to provide better care for people with drug problems.

This guidance has been developed for practitioners in Newcastle working with children and families and/or adults who have care of children where substance misuse is a factor, which affects their lives. It has been produced in response to the increasing problem of substance misuse and particularly the rising number of children who are referred into the child protection arena due to parental substance misuse.

This is the second in a series of guides on developing and implementing Integrated Care Pathways (ICPs). This guide identifies the steps involved in developing an ICP and examines each process in more detail.

It is aimed at anyone involved in commissioning, planning, developing, delivering and evaluating services for drug users.

Cross-government website for drug professionals and anyone interested in the national drug strategy.

In December 2002, the Government launched the Updated Drug Strategy 2002. This built upon, and adapted the Government's Drug Strategy Tackling Drugs to Build a Better Britain, launched in 1998. Aiming to reduce the harm that drugs cause to society - communities, individuals and their families - the Drug Strategy has four main elements: young people, reducing supply, communities, treatment.

This report summarises the results of the third and final sweep of a study to estimate the prevalence of ‘problem drug use’ (defined as use of opiates and/or crack cocaine) nationally (England only), regionally, and locally. An overview of national and Government Office Region estimates are presented in this report, as are comparisons with the estimates produced by the second (2005/06) sweep of the study.

This is a report of an inquiry by the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs in June 2003. It examines how problem drug users with parental responsibilities harm their children's health and well being. It is estimated that there are more than 250,000 children affected in the United Kingdom. The inquiry considers what is presently being done and what could be done in the future to reduce the number of children in this situation.

This resource is a summary of a research report into the Tayside Domestic Abuse and Substance Misuse Project. The findings presented in this report include a review of the literature on the links between domestic abuse and substance misuse, and secondary analysis of service user questionnaires, interviews with service users and interviews with domestic abuse and substance misuse service providers.

This short report provides an overview of Choosing Health, the Government’s recent public health White Paper, from a public mental health perspective. It aims to identify both the gaps and opportunities in the White Paper and to provide a framework for addressing these.

English National Evaluation fails to support Drug Education Programme. In the British context, it was expected to decide whether an evidence-based, well structured and well resourced drug education programme could contribute to reducing youth substance use, yet the multi-million pound Blueprint study never got near fulfilling its promise. Though nothing definitive could be concluded from the study, signs were that in both knowledge and prevention terms, the lessons were not an advance on routine personal, social and health education.