alcohol misuse

This Round-up examines family and friendship influences on young people’s drinking habits, in order to shed light on how the negative aspects of young people’s drinking culture in the UK might be changed.

The summary was published by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation in January 2011.

This is a joint Scottish Government and CoSLA statement which is addressed to anyone who has a role in improving outcomes for an individual, families or communities experiencing problematic drug and alcohol use. A statement which sets out the aim of identifying all actions required to deliver the alcohol and drug workforce and to outline the important roles and contributions of those directly involved in workforce development.

This study examined how parents ‘teach’ young children between the age of 5 to 12 about alcohol. It explored parents’ attitudes and family drinking practices using a national survey and in-depth case study research.

Report of a study which aimed to describe and critically appraise the procedures followed by the National Probation Service to identify and intervene with offenders who have alcohol problems.

Report examining seven case studies of initiatives designed to effect attitudinal, behavioural or policy change, e.g. youth smoking prevention, in order to discover what methods or lessons could be transferred from the case studies to approaches to tackling alcohol harm in the UK.

The Scottish Government has announced its intention to introduce a range of measures to tackle the problems associated with binge drinking and excessive and harmful consumption of alcohol in Scottish society. This is a policy document which involves intervention by the government in a market in a way which has a direct effect on prices for consumers, in the interests of a perceived public good, in this case public health, law and order, and a reduction in employment, health service and criminal justice costs. The document covers a number of aspects of this issue.

Report that highlights the findings of a collaborative research study undertaken by Scottish Health Action on Alcohol Problems (SHAAP) and the NSPCC’s ChildLine in Scotland service to explore children and young people’s experiences of harmful parental drinking and the concerns they express about the impact this is having on their lives.

In 2006, Aberlour Child Care Trust and the Scottish Association of Drug and Alcohol Teams joined together to hold a second Think Tank to address the question 'Alcohol or Drugs' Does it make a difference for the Child?'. This report is entirely drawn from the Think Tank’s discussions and represents the knowledge and views of experienced managers, practitioners and researchers. It does not include evidence from research or the content of policy and guidance documents.

This document sets out a new framework for local partnerships on alcohol and drugs. It aims to ensure that all bodies involved in tackling alcohol and drugs problems are clear about their responsibilities and their relationships with each other; and to focus activity on the identification, pursuit and achievement of agreed, shared outcomes.

Alcohol can cause both health and social problems. Some of the harm associated with alcohol is caused by acute intoxication, some by regular, excessive consumption over a long period. This fact sheet looks at the range of problems associated with alcohol dependence including psychological, physical or social problems.