alcohol misuse

Alcohol

Drinking alcohol is very common. For most people, it is an enjoyable part of a party or going out with friends. Most people who drink do not have a drink problem. However, for some children and young people who call ChildLine, alcohol does cause problems. This can be because they are drinking too much. More commonly though, it is because someone they care about – a parent, grandparent, brother, sister, girlfriend, boyfriend or a friend – is drinking too much. For these callers, alcohol is a problem. This is called alcohol abuse.

The safe parenting handbook

Handbook containing information and advice to help parents deal successfully with various issues which can affect children such as childcare, health and safety, education, sex and relationships.

The societal cost of alcohol misuse in Scotland for 2007

Although alcohol is widely recognised as a major generator of employment and income from exports in Scotland, a considerable (and increasing) amount of harm is associated with its misuse.

The effects of this misuse – which are considered in this paper – are wide, and generate substantial costs not only for the health service, but also for criminal justice, communities, employers, and the wider Scottish economy.

Attitudes towards alcohol: views of problem drinkers, alcohol service users and their families and friends (Health and Community Care Research Programme Research Findings No.12)

Between February and June 2001, the Scottish Executive Health Department undertook a consultation exercise to inform the development of its Plan for Action on alcohol problems. As part of this exercise, various pieces of research were commissioned to explore issues around alcohol misuse in Scottish society.

This paper presents the main findings of a study which obtained the views of problem drinkers,current and former alcohol service users and their families and friends.

Good practice guidance for working with children and families affected by substance misuse

This document was published by the Scottish Executive in 2003.

The first part of this guidance sets out what is currently known about the extent of parental substance misuse and the impact on children.

Part 2 sets out what agencies need to ask of families when they present with drug or alcohol problems, and provides guidance to staff on identifying risks.

Part 3 offers advice on what kinds of help may be needed, and on how to work together more effectively.

Mental health of Irish-born people in Britain

Mind is a leading mental health charity in England and Wales and has produced information on many areas of mental health. In recent years there has been growing concern within the Irish community, Mind and other agencies and professionals working in the mental health field about the mental health of Irish people in Britain. This factsheet aims to give an overview of how the mental health of the Irish community is negatively affected by many factors, including racism.

Recovery and communities of recovery (IN Drink and Drugs News)

This article, see page 15 of the magazine, by Professor David Clark introduces the work of William White and colleagues in the USA on the subject of recovery in the substance misuse field.

Sexual health, rights and staying safe : young people's views on sex and UK sexual health services

Report summarising the results of research into the views and experiences of young people in the UK with regard to sexual health and the reasons why some young people engage in risky sexual behaviour.