substance misuse

In this training programme for the social care workforce you’ll find detailed information about solvent and volatile substance abuse, together with a range of materials that you will be able to download and refer to again and again. This site also contains audio interviews, videos, factsheets and in-depth training materials that you’ll be able to take away and use in the training of others.

Third report from the National Drug Related Deaths Database (NDRDD) for Scotland which presents data for the calendar year 2011. The NDRDD was established to collect detailed information regarding the nature and social circumstances of individuals who have died a drug-related death.

This report supplements the routine reporting of drugrelated deaths in Scotland by the National Records of Scotland (NRS), formerly known as the General Register Office for Scotland. 

Report that aims not to establish one perfect model, but to identify the common strengths and barriers encountered by practitioners in local approaches to parental substance use. It focuses on both alcohol and drugs, as the emphasis is on children 
and local practice rather than the differences between individual substances.

Report that looks purely at family-based interventions that are specifically targeted towards families with drug and alcohol misuse problems. Family-based interventions include those that work with the whole family, the parent and the child and the examples referred to and the recommendations made should be considered only in relation to drugs and alcohol.

The Scottish Crime and Justice Survey (SCJS) is a large-scale continuous survey measuring people's experience and perceptions of crime in Scotland. The survey is based on 13,000 in-home face-to-face interviews with adults (aged 16 or over) living in private households in Scotland.

Study that compares the differences in the conviction rates of known offenders during the two years before their initial assessment for drug treatment and the two years after.

This book is based on a research project that explored how young men and women use alcohol as they move from their mid teens through to their late twenties. This period of life
is sometimes referred to as ‘the transition to adulthood’. We wanted to find out more about young people’s experiences of drinking during this time in their lives. To explore this in a dynamic way, we conducted eight activity based focus groups with young adults aged between 16–30.