HIV AIDS

Publication which has been financed by the United Nations Trust Fund on Family Activities, and provides funding support for research activities with an overall aim of promoting the objectives of the International Year of the Family. The five independent chapters were commissioned to focus on a number of relevant current international issues affecting families and the role of men in addressing them.

This report contains the views and concerns of people with HIV aged 50 and over, living into an old age that many of them never expected to see. The social care needs of this rapidly growing group have not previously been addressed in the UK. The 50 Plus research project asked 410 of them – 1 in 25 of all those currently being seen for care – for their views on their current and future lives. The report also analysed the resulting data to compare three of the largest subgroups: gay/bisexual men, black African women and white heterosexuals.

This factsheet discusses the way that HIV-related discrimination can intrude into many contexts and many parts of the lives of people living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA) and people thought to be HIV positive. It argues that for PLWHA, or those assumed to be HIV-positive, no area of life is untouched by stigma and no area of life is invulnerable to discrimination.

From the persecution of Jewish people in 12th Century England to society's attitude towards people with HIV and AIDS in 2002, prejudice, stigma and the 'fear of the unknown' have always been with us, playing a central role in dividing people, cultures and races. This factsheet looks at what makes us prejudiced and how we can challenge it.

This factsheet examines ways to respond effectively to HIV-related stigma and discrimination, and the implementation of a range of strategies that tackle prejudice and protect people's rights.

Website of Positively UK, a national charity which exists to help and support women living with HIV.

Stigmatisation and discrimination are not new to migrant communities, and the AIDS epidemic has played into and reinforced existing racism and xenophobia. This factsheet looks at the way ethnic and racial groups are often perceived and judged as a group, rather than as individuals. They are stereotyped as being 'aggressive', 'unqualified', 'uneducated', or 'criminal'. There is abundant evidence to refute each of these stereotypes.

This paper is about the HIV epidemic in the context of black Africans in England. It focuses on black African communities because they are disproportionately affected by HIV compared to other minority ethnic groups. It gives an overview of the current epidemiological status, HIV support and prevention needs and recommendations for policy and practice. The paper notes that the majority of black Africans are tested for HIV very late and are unable to benefit fully form available treatment and care. The impact of socio-economic factors is also discussed.

The Are You HIV Prejudiced? Campaign has been designed to challenge HIV related stigma and discrimination by providing information and triggering a debate on how to challenge HIV prejudice. This central website has been developed for the general public interested in tackling HIV prejudice. It also provides up to date information for people living with or affected by HIV discrimination in the UK.

This factsheet examines the potential of anti-discrimination law to protect people living with HIV from discrimination in the UK. It argues the law is seriously hampered by the complexity and inconsistent way in which it seeks to promote equality and address discrimination.