medical treatment

Covert medication is the administration of any medical treatment in disguised form.  These guidelines cover:

  • The legal framework for the use of covert medication
  • Practical guidance in how to administer it
  • A suggested care pathway for its use
  • Case examples

The purpose of this Act of Scottish Parliament is to provide for decisions to be made on behalf of adults who lack legal capacity to do so themselves because of mental disorder or inability to communicate. The decisions concerned may be about the adult's property or financial affairs, or about their personal welfare, including medical treatment. The Act is in 7 parts.

The role of GPs in safeguarding children has long been seen as vital to inter-agency collaboration in child protection processes and to promoting early intervention in families. It has often been characterized as problematic to engage GPs and recognized that potential conflicts of interest may constrain their engagement.

In spring 2008, DrugScope hosted a series of seminars on the future of drug treatment. The Great Debate gathered together DrugScope members, along with other experts and stakeholders with direct experience of drug treatment, representing a range of different views and treatment philosophies.

Booklet produced as a guide for older people with epilepsy to help them cope better with their condition. It covers topics such as what epilepsy is, its causes and treatment and advice on living safely and well with epilepsy.

Leaflet whose purpose is to support women with epilepsy by giving them a better understanding of their condition. It offers information and advice on matters which may affect women in their lives such as contraception, family planning, pregnancy and motherhood.

Leaflet containing general information about epilepsy and its effects such as its symptoms, how it is treated and services and support available to enable epilepsy sufferers to carry out everyday activities such as education and employment.

this strategy sets out a significant programme of reform to tackle Scotland’s drug problem and make a contribution to the Government’s overarching purpose, which is to increase sustainable economic growth. Central to the strategy is a new approach to tackling problem drug use based firmly on the concept of recovery. Recovery is a process through which an individual is enabled to move-on from their problem drug use towards a drug-free life and become an active and contributing member of society.

People who have been diagnosed with dementia, or who are worried that they may develop dementia in the future, are often concerned about how decisions regarding their medical treatment might be made should they lose the ability to decide for themselves. They may fear that life-sustaining or life-prolonging treatments would be provided long after they were able to achieve a level of recovery, length of life or quality of life that the person would at present consider to be acceptable or tolerable.

Briefly reports on the findings of a study which aimed to evaluate the effect of a video decision support tool on the preferences for future medical care in older people if they develop advanced dementia, and the stability of those preferences after six weeks.