health care

SCIE report 18: looking out from the middle: user involvement in health and social care in Northern Ireland

The Northern Ireland Social Care Council (NISCC), the Regulation and Quality Improvement Authority (RQIA) and the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) commissioned this research with the aim of strengthening user involvement in Northern Ireland. Report 18 looks across health and social care services for children, young people and adults. Report published by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) in February 2008.

Community Catalysts

Website of a company that seeks to harness the talents of people and communities to provide imaginative solutions to complex social issues and care needs.

A Community Interest Company established by and working in close partnership with the charity NAAPS UK.

Routes for social and health care: a simulation exercise

Routes was the name given to a simulation-based project designed by Loop2 to explore how the evolution of the adult social care and health care systems could be managed to create real synergies between them.

It was commissioned by The King’s Fund, in partnership with the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE), the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services (ADASS) and the Local Government Association (LGA). The project was steered by an advisory group drawn from these bodies.

Health and social care bill: bill 132 of 2010-11: research paper 11/11

This briefing on the Health and Social Care Bill has been prepared for the Second Reading debate on the Bill in the House of Commons on 31 January 2011. The Bill is intended to give effect to the reforms requiring primary legislation that were proposed in the NHS White Paper Equity and excellence: Liberating the NHS. This White Paper set out the Government’s aims to reduce central control of the NHS, to engage doctors in the commissioning of health services, and to give patients greater choice. Published in January 2011. Applies to health and social care in England.

Let me be me: a handbook for managers and staff working with disabled children and their families

This public sector improvement handbook was published in April 2003 by the Audit Commission for local authorities and the National Health Service in England and Wales. It "has been designed for managers and staff who work with disabled children and their families across different agencies and disciplines". It suggests the best way to improve services for disabled children is for all those concerned to work more closely together.

The report of the Older People's Inquiry into 'That Bit of Help'

The report focuses on how to involve older people alongside the professionals, as equals, in identifying what services they want and value. It notes that older people are able to take account of costs of service provision in an environment where resources are limited, and with this information they are able to prioritise the service provision which they require.

Care and support - a community responsibility? (summary report)

Any new settlement on long-term care and support must address the apportionment of responsibility for its delivery as well as its funding. With the state's capacity limited and family input likely to decline, the wider community must expect to play a growing role. This offers an opportunity to end social care's marginalisation, argues David Brindle.

Better Together: Scotland's Patient Experience Programme: Patient Priorities for Inpatient Care Report No. 5/2009

This research was commissioned by the Scottish Government as part of Better Together Scotland’s Patient Experience Programme. The objectives of this work were to establish a hierarchy of issues important to Scottish patients receiving hospital inpatient care and to test for differences in priorities among demographic groups. The results could then be used to inform the development of tools to measure inpatient experiences across Scotland.

The costs of child poverty for individuals and society: a literature review

This report examines the costs of child poverty to individuals and wider society, through reduced productivity, lower educational attainment and poor health. It explores the financial consequences of child poverty for individuals, families, neighbourhoods and society.

Welcome and Introductions : Social Work and Health Inequalities Research Seminar Series

This podcast is part of the Social Work and Health Inequalities Research Seminar Series. In this podcast, George Palattiyill and Paul Bywaters review the progress of and areas covered by this seminar series so far.