health

Research that profiles the work of 19 projects with the aim of illustrating how asset-based approaches are being supplied in Scotland.

The case studies highlight the key characteristics of asset-based working and demonstrate the strengths and challenges of the approach for individuals, the wider community and project staff.

Tool for supporting the evaluation of public involvement and participation in health services. A partner to the Participation Toolkit, it is a stand-alone guide for assessing the way in which a participation project has been undertaken (process) and the results of that activity (outcomes). It does not set out to be a definitive guide to evaluation, but aims to provide resources, references and tools to help people develop their own approach to evaluation.

The guide will:

Paper that explores the Scottish evidence for a link between social capital and health outcomes in order to inform the ongoing development of an assets-based approach to addressing health problems and inequalities.

It uses data from two sources – the 2009 Scottish Health Survey and the 2009 Scottish Social Attitudes survey, although the majority of the paper focuses on the former due to the inclusion of self-assessed health plus WEMWBS variables.

Data from the Census in 2001 found that carers are a third more likely to be in poor health than non carers. The more recent Scottish Household Survey found that 12% of carers reported that they were in poor health. This increases to 18% for those caring for 20 hours or more each week. 12% of people termed in the Scottish Household Survey as “economically inactive” providing care also consider themselves to be permanent sick or disabled.

Toolkit compiled to support NHS staff in delivering Patient Focus and Public Involvement. It offers a number of tried and tested tools along with some more recently developed approaches.

Understanding Glasgow sets out to describe the city and its people. The website aims to create an accessible resource that will inform a wide audience about issues of importance to Glasgow's population (e.g. health, poverty, education, environment, etc) and that will illustrate trends, make comparisons both within the city and with other cities, allow progress to be monitored and encourage discussion and engagement about the future of the city.

Report that analyses the factors that influence the demand for health and social care, taking a long-term perspective. It shows that pressures to increase spending on health and social care will result in these services consuming an increasing proportion of gross domestic product.

The exact proportion will depend on how quickly the economy itself grows, and on the choices made about the levels of taxation, government borrowing and public spending priorities.

One of three papers which explores the practicalities of delivering housing for older people and maximising the benefits to health and wellbeing.