screening

This page contains the findings of systematic reviews undertaken by review groups linked to the EPPI-Centre. The research evidence is largely relevant to screening for cystic fibrosis (CF), and little refers to screening for phenylketonuria (PKU), congenital hypothyroidism (CHT) or sickle cell disorders (SCD). This topic is included in the EPPI-Centre knowledge library. The Knowledge Pages facility enables users to search for the key messages within specific subject areas to which EPPI-Centre reviews have contributed.

This is a summary of research about communication with parents for newborn screening. This systematic review was published by EPPI-Centre in 2003. Systematic reviews aim to find as much as possible of the research relevant to the particular research questions, and use explicit methods to identify what can reliably be said on the basis of these studies.

The aim of this systematic review is to assess the impact of communication about disclosing carrier status following newborn screening; and to collate the relevant evidence about parents’ and health professionals’ views. This systematic review was published by EPPI-Centre in 2004. Systematic reviews aim to find as much as possible of the research relevant to the particular research questions, and use explicit methods to identify what can reliably be said on the basis of these studies.

This systematic review was published by EPPI-Centre in 2005. Systematic reviews aim to find as much as possible of the research relevant to the particular research questions, and use explicit methods to identify what can reliably be said on the basis of these studies.

This resource produced by Down's Syndrome Scotland, provides information on the screening and testing methods used to try and detect Down's Syndrome in an unborn child.

Report of a study which aimed to determine what impact the dependence on self-report of smoking status during pregnancy has on both access to smoking cessation services and the accuracy of smoking prevalence figures in the pregnant population of Scotland.

Alcoholism is one of the most common psychiatric disorders with a prevalence of 8 to 14 percent. This heritable disease is frequently accompanied by other substance abuse disorders (particularly nicotine), anxiety and mood disorders, and antisocial personality disorder.

Although associated with considerable morbidity and mortality, alcoholism often goes unrecognized in a clinical or primary health care setting. Several brief screening instruments are available to quickly identify problem drinking, often a pre-alcoholism condition.

Social Work Intervention is suitable for use once students have appreciated the basic structure and content of the legal rules, which can be applied to a case. Social Work Intervention will raise awareness of: the legal rules that create the framework for social work intervention; the different points of intervention: initial referral and screening, assessment and care planning; and review and re-assessment.

Paper looking at the challenges facing professionals in health and social care in dealing with service users with dual diagnosis, the co-existence of substance misuse and mental health problems.