childrens guardians

Report that builds on an earlier report (Crawley and Kohli 2012) and consolidates some the preliminary findings, incorporating the evidence and conclusions gathered from Years 1 and 2 of the evaluation process.

A study on ―best practices in the field of the return of minors was carried out by ECRE, in strategic partnership with Save the Children, on behalf of the European Commission. The study looked at
legislation and practice regarding the return of children, either unaccompanied or within families, who return voluntarily or are forced to return because of their status as illegally staying third country
nationals.

Report that presents ECPAT's UK's response to what they see as the government's resistance to meeting international obligations to introduce a system of guardianship for child victims of trafficking.

It has been drafted on the basis of communication with a range of parliamentarians, countries in which a system of guardianship has been introduced, two workshops with ECPAT UK’s Youth Group and a comprehensive legal analysis of the UK’s national and international obligations to child victims of trafficking.

Since the case of Baby P, there has been a 40% increase in the number of children taken into care by the state. There are now 70,000 children being 'looked after' in the system. What happens to them? Can the system offer them a better life? Panorama follows children in the care of Coventry Social Services for six months to find out if the state can be a real parent - even though children in care are more at risk of failing school and committing crime than any other group. Narrated by Samantha Morton, who herself grew up in care.

This episode of Radio 4's Woman's Hour series asks if children who get taken into care should be looked after by strangers or by members of their own family. The Children's Act says children should be looked after by family members - if they want to take on the responsibility and are deemed suitable. But on Woman's Hour, the Family Rights Group says family and friends are too often ignored or rebuffed by social services. If the family does get approved they don't always get the financial support they need.

This is the first of 4 volumes of comprehensive guidance on the Children (Scotland) Act 1995. The Regulations, Directions and Guidance which are included in this and other volumes are designed to provide guidance on the implementation of Parts II, III and IV of the Act.

This includes promotion of child welfare; the planning of childrens' services; provision of accommodation and day care services; children and disability; protecting children and short-term refuge for children at risk of harm.

This research project was commissioned by the Scottish Executive to find out how advocacy for children in the Children’s Hearings System compares with arrangements in other UK systems of child welfare and youth justice and those internationally, and what children and young people and the professionals who work with them think about advocacy arrangements in the Children’s Hearings System and how these can be improved.

This Act lays down the statutory requirements and responsibilities of parents, guardians, local authorities and other bodies in the welfare and protection of children. This includes children's hearings, adoption, protection and supervision.

Summary of the document: Getting it right for every child: proposals for action: summary of consultation analysis. The consultation document getting it right for every child: proposals for action, which was published on 21 June 2005, identified three main areas for improvement: Improving and unifying the services for children, strengthening the children’s hearings system and modernising the children’s hearings system.