government and social policy

Major changes in tenure over the last 25 years mean that two out of three people in Scotland are home-owners and half of social housing is provided by independent non-profit organisations. Despite these changes, longstanding challenges still remain to be met, and new challenges are emerging. This study looks back over the past decade of Scottish housing policy and forward to the next, as well as, provides an overview of housing outcomes in Scotland and how housing policy contributes to these.

This publication is intended for everyone who is concerned with looked after children and young people and their families. This includes: elected members, local authority staff, staff in voluntary organisations, private providers, foster carers, health professionals and those involved in developing and improving children’s services.

Scottish Ministers issued for consultation 23 proposals for the reform of children’s services and invited all those with an interest to let us know what they thought.

This report represents the plan implemented by the Scottish Government in order to reduce the bureaucracy that gets in the way of ensuring children are protected. Children must have their needs met and, where necessary, action must be taken to protect others from children’s behaviour.

Scottish Government evaluation of the Reading Rich programme, a partnership between National Children's Homes Scotland and the Scottish Book Trust which aimed to introduce a 'reading rich' environment for children and young people who are looked after in residential and foster care settings in Scotland so they could benefit from reading, books and literature. It ran from 2004 to 2007.

Time and money are two key constraints on what people can achieve. The income constraint is widely recognised by policy-makers and social scientists in their concern with poverty. Proposed solutions often focus on getting people into paid work, but this risks ignoring the demands people may have on their time. This study looks at individuals who are significantly limited by time and income constraints: those who could escape income poverty only by incurring time poverty, or vice versa.

National guidance from the Scottish Government on legislation, policies and practices to prevent and resolve homelessness. It provides practical guidance on how the legislation and related policies should be implemented.

It supports our objective that homeless people receive readily accessible services tailored to their needs.

This report summarises the final evaluation report of the Working for Families Fund (WFF) programme from 2004-08. It was carried out by the Employment Research Institute, Napier University, Edinburgh, for the Scottish Government over this period.

Over the four years the budget for WFF was £50 million, a total of 25,508 clients were registered, 53% of all clients (13,594) achieved 'hard' outcomes, such as employment, and a further 13% (3,283) achieved other significant outcomes.

This is the report of an inspection carried out under the Children act 2004. The purpose of the inspection was to evaluate the contribution made by local services towards ensuring children and young people are properly safeguarded and to determine the quality of service provision for looked after children and care leavers.

The overall effectiveness of safeguarding services in Staffordshire was grade 3 (adequate). The effectiveness of services for looked after children and young people is adequate overall but with some good and outstanding features.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is an important longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond.

The study is funded by the Scottish Government and carried out by the Scottish Centre for Social Research (ScotCen). Its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

This report aims to demonstrate how poor mental health is a significant cause of wider social and health problems, including: low levels of educational achievement and work productivity; higher levels of physical disease and mortality; violence, relationship breakdown and poor community cohesion. In contrast, good mental health leads to better physical health, healthier lifestyles, improved productivity and educational attainment and lower levels of crime and violence.