government and social policy

Public support is needed to ensure that the government and other organisations take action to tackle poverty in the UK. The perception of poverty is often misguided, with people believing that it is a result of laziness, or an inevitable part of modern life.

The aim of this research is to identify ways of changing such perceptions and building public support for addressing the problem.

The Skills Utilisation Action Group presents this report on the inspection of the assessment and management offenders who present a high risk of serious harm by Social Work Inspection Agency (SWIA), HM Inspectorate of Constabulary for Scotland (HMICS) and HM Inspectorate of Prisons (HMIP).

Research on public attitudes to inequality has tended to focus more on revealing attitudes than exploring what motivates them. This study aims to fill some of the gaps in existing research to provide useful insights for practitioners and policy-makers.

This is a report on the Consultation on the Review of the No Secrets guidance. It is about safeguarding adults. It describes how the consultation took place and it analyses the responses received. It summarises the views of some 12,000 people. It does not include a government response.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is an important longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond.

The study is funded by the Scottish Government and carried out by the Scottish Centre for Social Research (ScotCen). Its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

The Mental Health (Care and Treatment) (Scotland) Act 2003 was passed by the Scottish Parliament on 20 March 2003 and came into force in October 2005. It was clear from the ongoing monitoring to which the Act was subject that there were some areas in which problems were being experienced. Accordingly, the Scottish Government decided to institute a limited review of the Act.

Following the launch of the Scottish Government’s new policy and action plan for mental health improvement (MHI) for 2009-11, Towards a Mentally Flourishing Scotland an event was held to support the implementation. The meeting brought together key national agencies and partners with responsibility for mental health improvement, together with senior officials from the Scottish Government, local government and the NHS.

The Housing (Scotland) Act 2001 extended the duties of local authorities toward homeless people in Scotland, while also recognising that Registered Social Landlords (RSLs) had an increasing role to play in providing housing for statutorily homeless households. A growing body of evidence suggests the use of Section 5 differs across Scotland and that its use may be less than had originally been anticipated. There also seems to be confusion regarding the purpose and scope of the requirements.

This toolkit is intended to provide guidance to Alcohol and Drugs Partnership (ADP) in operating in an outcomes based environment and to support working relationships with local partners and service providers. This toolkit is intended to assist ADPs to identify local priority outcomes relating to alcohol and drugs.

Drug and alcohol misuse are major problems in Scotland but resources to address them are not always used effectively. In this study, published information on services was analysed and national documents were reviewed, expenditure data from all NHS boards and councils were collected and analysed and activity data from all police forces in Scotland were collected to give an indication of expenditure.