government and social policy

Plan for Scotland’s wheelchair and seating services changes by 2010. The changes will affect all five of the wheelchair and seating centres in Inverness, Aberdeen, Dundee, Edinburgh and Glasgow.

A report from Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Education and the Social Work Inspectorate, which covers the results of an inspection into the social work and educational services provided to meet the educational needs of children in the care of local authorities.

The number of children aged seven and under who are excluded from primary schools is very small but some children of this age are receiving fixed-period exclusions, occasionally leading to permanent exclusion. This study investigated the reasons for this and the ways some schools manage to avoid using exclusion. Sixty nine schools participated in a survey. Thirty schools had excluded several young children. Another 27 schools, each near to one of the first 30 schools, had not excluded any children in the same period. Twelve schools had only excluded one child, but on several occasions.

The government has high-profile child poverty targets which are assessed using a measure of income, as recorded in the Household Below Average Income series (HBAI).

However, income is an imperfect measure of living standards. Previous analysis suggests that some children in households with low income do not have commensurately low living standards.

This report aims to document the extent to which this is true, focusing on whether children in low-income households have different living standards depending on whether their parents are employed, self-employed, or workless.

This publication presents annual estimates of the proportion and number of children, working age adults and pensioners living in low income households in Scotland and the distribution of household income across Scotland.

The estimates are used to monitor progress towards UK and Scottish Government targets to reduce poverty and income inequality. The data published for the first time here are for the financial year April 2007 to March 2008.

This strategy sets out the Scottish Government’s expectations of further developments in telecare: telecare to contribute significantly to the achievement of personalised health and social care outcomes for individuals; telecare to contribute significantly to delivering wider national benefits in areas such as shifting the balance of care and the management of long-term health conditions; and local partnerships to mainstream telecare within local service planning.

This enabling guidance is intended to help primary care trust providers of community services to move their relationship with their commissioners to a purely contractual one and consider what type of organisations would best meet the future needs of patients and local communities, and how change can be managed to support the transformation of services to patients.

Scottish Government publication aimed at preventing offending by young people. It outlines a shared ambition of what the government and its partners want to do to as national and local agencies to prevent, divert, manage and change offending behaviour by children and young people - and how they want to do it.

The framework is broad in its scope, spanning prevention, diversion, intervention and risk management, with reference to the individual, the family and the wider community. It reaches from pre-birth and early years to the transition to adult services.

A large scale study was conducted to examine whether Local Safeguarding Children Boards (LSCBs) have successful in overcoming some of the weaknesses in Area Child Protection Committees. This interim report draws upon research undertaken over the first 12 months (January 2008 - January 2009) of the research study.

The European Union exerts a powerful influence over our lives, but few anti-poverty organisations take an active role in influencing what the EU does. This briefing highlights the role of the EU in relation to social policy, and how organisations can get involved.