welfare state

Launched in August 2006, the National Telecare Development Programme (TDP) aims to help more people in Scotland live at home for longer, with safety and security, by promoting the use of telecare in Scotland through the provision of a development fund and associated support.

This report evaluates the impact of the first two years of operation.

The most deprived areas in Scotland will take the biggest financial hit when the present welfare reforms come into effect. This is the conclusion of research commissioned by the Scottish Parliament’s Welfare Reform Committee.

Paper that is the first instalment of a three-part series on welfare.

It examines the impacts of the UK Government’s welfare cuts and reforms. Subsequent papers will look at how Scotland uses existing powers better to improve prospects for learning and work, as well as exploring the potential for additional powers and the principles which should underline a progressive approach to welfare.

Briefing that looks at how effectively local authorities have been in managing their DHP fund since budgets were increase, as well as considering each local authority’s DHP policy. The aim is to support local authorities in making the best use of their DHP budgets to help those affected by welfare cuts.

Interim report on the report the evidence that it has heard so far and to make some key points, given the disturbing nature of what it has heard. The situation with regard to the 'bedroom tax‘ remains dynamic, with the number of tenants affected and arrears levels 
changing by the month.

The removal of the spare room subsidy, also known as the bedroom tax or under occupation penalty, came into force on 1 April 2013. The aim of the policy was twofold: to reduce housing benefit expenditure, and to use existing public sector housing stock more efficiently.

The government estimated that 80,000 claimants in Scotland would be affected by the bedroom tax, with an average weekly loss of £12. This represented approximately 33% of the working age housing benefit claimants in Scotland.

Report on the Housing Benefit Under-Occupation Charge to the Welfare Reform Committee of the Scottish Parliament.

The research was commissioned to give a deeper understanding of scale and the depth of those affected (at Scottish and local authority level) by the under-occupation charge and the capacity of the system to meet down-sizing demand via one bed vacancies coming forward in a given year (a rough proxy for capacity).

Report that relates to Section 4 of the Act which places an obligation on Scottish Ministers to report to the Scottish Parliament over the next five years on the impact that the UK Welfare Reform Act is likely to have on people in Scotland.

It includes:

Report that develops the theme that social care and social work are, in some ways, uniquely  affected by wider changes in society. These changes can occur in relation to economics, attitudes, demographics, and policy. But all can have a profound effect on what is expected of,  and delivered by, social care services.