social inclusion

The London Development Centre, with the support of the Mental Health Foundation, set up the Day Services Modernisation Task Group, drawing on expertise from London’s statutory and voluntary providers, and service users. This modernisation toolkit is the main output of the group. London’s day services, like those found in the rest of the country, represent a broad mix of voluntary, statutory, independent and community based service providers.

Summary of a report which argues for an end to significant differences in health and health care between and within countries through actions such as improving daily living conditions, tackling the inequitable distribution of power, money and resources, measuring the problem and assessing the impact of action.

Document arguing for an end to the significant differences in health and health care between and within countries through actions such as improving daily living conditions, tackling the inequitable distribution of power, money and resources, measuring the problem and assessing the impact of action.

This conference report examines the issues relating to making advocacy more accessible for everyone. Specifically, the report looks at what can be done to promote diversity and inclusion, the importance of advocacy for people with dementia, what children and young people want from advocacy, and the advocacy needs of deaf, deafblind and hard of hearing people.

'The same as you?' review of services for people with learning disabilities was published in 2000 and set out a 10-year programme of change that would support children and adults with learning disabilities and Autism Spectrum Disorders (including Asperger’s Syndrome) to lead full lives, giving them choice about where they live and what they do.

This report was produced by the Day Services Group, a subgroup of the National Implementation Group, which was set up to look at how day services in Scotland are putting the recommendations of The same as you? (SAY) into practice.

Podcast of a talk by Val Cumine, Senior Educational Psychologist, Lancashire County Council, given at "Talking about Autism", Scottish Autism Toolbox conference, Jordanhill, Glasgow, 29/05/2009.

Report examining the potential role of non-governmental community-based organisations in tackling social exclusion and offering an analysis of the challenges involved in making inclusion a positive reality.

This paper outlines the key findings from a study which examined the community care and mental health needs of, and current service provision for, sensory impaired adults in Scotland. The study involved a literature review, a mapping exercise of existing services, and consultation with service planners and providers and with service users and their carers. The research focussed on Deaf, deafened, blind, partially sighted and dual sensory impaired adults.

The Scottish Recovery Indicator (SRI) is a mental health service development tool designed to aid mental health services in making sure their activities are focused on assisting the recovery of people using their services. The SRI is a three-stage process involving planning and preparation, collecting data and drawing up a service development plan.