social exclusion

Report that looks at what has changed in the two-and-a-half years since the last report in 2009. It examines low income, work, benefits and education. What emerges is a complex picture. There has been continued long-term improvement in some areas and persistent problems in others.

There are variations both between and within geographical areas and population groups. In all of this, there is the sense that while the position is no worse than three years ago,it is also no better, and Northern Ireland is now faced by the uncertainties of public sector cuts and welfare reform.

The Poverty and Social Exclusion in the UK Project is funded by the Economic, Science and Research Council (ESRC). The Project is a collaboration between the University of Bristol, University of Glasgow, Heriot Watt University, Open University, Queen’s University (Belfast), University of York, the National Centre for Social Research and the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency. The project commenced in April 2010 and will run for three-and-a-half years.

This report details findings of the Key Family Research Project that ran from October 2009 to March 2010 and used the Sustainable Livelihoods Approach (SLA) to map the lives of several families experiencing poverty and social exclusion in the London boroughs of Hackney and Waltham Forest.

This report comes at a time when the UK government has outlined its main policy intentions and its strategy to reduce poverty. Although the statistics presented in this report still almost entirely reflect the policies of the previous government, the Labour record is the Coalition inheritance.

This commentary discusses the implications of that record for the current government in the light of its commitments on child poverty and social mobility set out in strategy documents published in 2011.

Report which is the result of a large scoping review of the research literature in an attempt to understand the many and complex reasons behind poor frontline service responses to adults with multiple needs, with a particular focus on those in contact with the criminal justice system.

This learning activity is Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) e-learning resource, published in 2008. These elearning resources are freely available to all users and, through audio, video and interactive uses of technology, bring alive key aspects of poverty, parenting and social exclusion with particular reference to children and families.

This review provides a summary of evidence to help develop, implement and evaluate interventions for promoting good mental health amongst young people aged 11 to 21 years. The review is particularly focussed on young people from socially excluded groups and on interventions to prevent suicide and self-harm, and associated depression, and the promotion of self-esteem and coping strategies.

This systematic review was published by EPPI-Centre in 20 .Systematic reviews aim to find as much as possible of the research relevant to the particular research questions, and use explicit methods to identify what can reliably be said on the basis of these studies.

There is widespread policy concern with high rates of unintended teenage pregnancy in the UK, the highest in Western Europe. Social disadvantage and teenage pregnancy are strongly related. This review systematically examines research relating to policy initiatives aimed at tackling the social exclusion associated with unintended teenage pregnancy and young parenthood. Two separate reviews of evidence were conducted: a review of evidence relating to the prevention of unintended pregnancy; and a review of the research evidence relating to the support of teenage parents.