public sector

Report presenting the findings from the first phase of a research project set up to investigate how local government can build up more trusting relationships with its citizens. Based on the findings, it identifies a new typology of the trust relationships which the public wants to cultivate with government.

Collection of papers focusing on the theme of renewing and refocusing understanding of innovation. It explores the notion that everyday interactions between people and public services are a potential source of new ideas and that public services should be developed through participation and co-production.

The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) is the UK's leading research funding and training agency addressing economic and social concerns. They aim to provide high quality research on issues of importance to business, the public sector and government.

Paper discussing the concept of service design and arguing that it can offer policy makers and practitioners a vision for the transformation of public services, as well as a path to get there. It lays out an agenda for action which shows how service design approaches can be applied systematically.

Collection of case studies and papers which advocate collaboration as a new approach to running local public services. It attempts to provide answers to the questions, why work together?, where can the beginnings of new approaches be found? and what form would government take if it was redesigned for collaboration?

This report presents findings of a study of public bodies’ approach to implementing the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 (the DDA) and provides evidence for a baseline against which to assess the extent to which the Disability Discrimination Act 2005 (the 2005 Act) prompts authorities to promote equality of opportunity for disabled people.

Report setting out what the concept of agility in government means and why it is potentially useful for public sector managers. It examines the changing context in which governments are operating and explains the reasons why developing greater agility can help public services respond to new challenges.

Key messages are presented from a study looking at mental health services provided by the NHS, councils, prisons, the police and the voluntary sector across Scotland for all ages. The study examines the accessibility and availability of mental health services and how much is spent on them.

The report provides an overview of mental health services and is the first in a series of planned reports in this area. The researchers carried out an overview to highlight areas for improvement and to identify priorities for future audit work.

This report, created by the Audit Commission, looks at how the Human Rights Act can help to improve public services, as it seeks to ensure the delivery of quality services that meet the needs of individual service users.

The report highlights that not only has the Act increased public service providers’ awareness of the rights of the individual, but it has also meant an increased risk of legal challenge by service users.

This study aims to increase understanding of how politicians think and talk about economic inequality, both in private and in public. It compares politicians' attitudes across and between five major political parties: the Conservatives, Labour, the Liberal Democrats, Plaid Cymru, and the Scottish National Party. The research is particularly relevant given the recent turbulence with the financial system, the correspondingly high levels of attention upon the City and bonus culture, and the recession.