policy

‘Commissioning’ is a word that is increasingly heard by those who work with children, young people and their families. This publication has been written specifically for community organisations to help them understand commissioning and seize the opportunities that this process affords. These include the opportunity to use their local knowledge to shape services for children and young people, as well as being funded to deliver those services.

The European Union exerts a powerful influence over our lives, but few anti-poverty organisations take an active role in influencing what the EU does. This briefing highlights the role of the EU in relation to social policy, and how organisations can get involved.

Foster children have difficult early lives. Their needs are great, their educational performance can be poor, their childhoods in foster care and out of it are often unstable. In their adult lives they are at greater risk than others of a wide variety of difficulties. These 'facts' have led some to conclude that the state is not an adequate parent.

Briefing paper covering the issues and knowledge base around the subject of deliberate self-harm among children and young people.

Report presenting the findings of a review which was set up to assess whether services were adequately meeting the mental health needs of children and young people in Wales.

In particular, its aim was to discover how comprehensive, accessible and effective services were and whether robust mechanisms were in place for managing service delivery and improvement.

In April 1997 the Social Services Inspectorate undertook an inspection of the child protection services in Cambridgeshire's Social Services Department. This inspection took place at the request of the Parliamentary Under Secretary in the Department of Health following the non-accidental death of Rikki Neave, a child on Cambridgeshire's child protection register. The 1997 inspection identified serious deficiencies in the standard of child protection services in Cambridgeshire.

This framework represents to all stakeholders and to the people of Scotland a vision for how anti-social behaviour should be tackled and how committed the Scottish government is to championing its principles through the work of diverse yet complementary organisations.

This research project was commissioned by the Scottish Executive to find out how advocacy for children in the Children’s Hearings System compares with arrangements in other UK systems of child welfare and youth justice and those internationally, and what children and young people and the professionals who work with them think about advocacy arrangements in the Children’s Hearings System and how these can be improved.

The manifesto sets out a plan of action based on the findings of The Good Childhood Inquiry®, ‘A Good Childhood: Searching for Values in a Competitive Age’, which stimulated a major national debate about how the nation treats its young people. The manifesto identifies three key areas in which political leaders must act to improve childhood now and for future generations, and calls for every political party to write these pledges into their manifestos.

Paper developed with input and advice from a range of partners who deliver for young people. It is set out in 3 sections: context, common principles, and connections.

It is intended as a practical resource for anyone making decisions that affect the support we give young people or anyone involved in delivering services to them. It can provide a point of common reference and a tool for making connections.