social policy

The Child Protection Review Team of the Scottish Executive Department commissioned MORI Scotland to conduct a programme of research. The overall aim of this research was to assess levels of public knowledge and understanding of the current child protection processes and within this, look at expectations that the public have about the role of the individual, community and public agency in child protection and the degree to which each should take responsibility or become involved.

The British Institute of Human Rights (BIHR) is an independent charity based in London which raises awareness and understanding about the importance of human rights. It works for disadvantaged and vulnerable communities in the UK, seeking to ensure that the principles of equality, dignity and respect are incorporated into practice and policy at all levels of public service. The website includes details of programmes, events and training as well as FAQs and external web links.

This review seeks to bring a somewhat hidden issue into the light, examining it and considering how the knowledge identified here might influence the future direction of services. Parenting as such has, rightly, gained increasing prominence over the last few years – but the parenting support needs of disabled parents have been largely ignored. This review was developed with two aims in mind. First, to bring together the research literature on disabled parents and, second, to set that research within the context of the policy and practice thinking of its time.

Policy makers are becoming increasingly concerned with the long term consequences of childhood experiences. This concern is fuelled by the belief that the early years of life are crucial in shaping later life. Catch them young and save society trouble later on, runs the argument. Kenan Malik asks whether policies towards young children are based on reliable scientific evidence or on political claims.

This briefing paper has been produced by SHAAP (Scottish Health Action on Alcohol Problems) following a conference held at the Royal College of Physicians in Edinburgh on 7th February 2008. The aim of the conference was to identify barriers to the delivery of brief interventions in the Scottish Health Service and to pinpoint action required to overcome them.

This report from the Social Justice Policy Group, chaired by Iain Duncan Smith, identifies five 'pathways' to poverty and makes proposals for tackling them. These pathways are: educational failure, family breakdown, economic dependence, indebtedness and addictions. A sixth section considers how the third sector might be better supported to help people escape poverty.

This website of the Institute for Public Policy Research (ippr) is the UK's leading progressive think tank with strong networks in government, academia, corporate and voluntary sectors. They produce policy analysis, reports and publications which play a vital role in maintaining the momentum of progressive thought.

The purpose of this consultation paper is to explore how the law relating to the physical punishment of children can be modernised, so that it better protects children from harm. The aim of the consultation is to address two specific issues. First, within the context of a modern family policy, in a responsible society, where should we draw the line as to what physical punishment of children is acceptable within the family setting? Second, how do we achieve that position in law?

The Runnymede Trust aims to promote a successful multi-ethnic Britain - a Britain where citizens and communities feel valued, enjoy equal opportunities to develop their talents, lead fulfilling lives and accept collective responsibility, all in the spirit of civic friendship, shared identity and a common sense of belonging. They also act as a bridge-builder between various minority ethnic communities and policy-makers.

Public Concern at Work (PCaW) is an independent authority on public interest whistleblowing. Established as a charity in 1993 following a series of scandals and disasters, PCaW has played a leading role in putting whistleblowing on the governance agenda and in influencing the content of legislation in the UK and abroad.