social policy

Working together for Scotland: making it work together - a programme for government

Policy document which sets out the government's objectives for social policy to improve the lives of Scottish people in collaboration with the public, private and voluntary sectors, local government and the UK Government.

The document sets out achievements and targets in the following: justice, education and lifelong learning, health and community care, environment, transport, drugs and finance.

Getting it right together : unit 3 : a history of learning disabilities

This resource - Getting it right together on learning disabilities, has been written for all pre-registration nursing students in Scotland. It comprises five units of study that will support something in the order of 12 to 15 hours of directed and, or, facilitated learning on a range of issues that relate to learning disabilities. Unit 3 looks at the history of learning disabilities.

Professionalism, partnership and joined-up thinking : a research review of front-line working with children and families

This review directly addresses the practical implications of multiprofessional and multiagency working on the front line. It draws messages from a diffuse range of literature spanning organisational theories, research and practice to offer guidance to practitioners, team leaders and educators. While relating the evidence to historical, theoretical and current policy contexts, it retains a primary interest in the day-to-day experience of professionals in social care, education, health and other areas, and in trying to improve the outcomes for vulnerable children and families.

Improving support for black disabled people: lessons from community organisations on making change happen

This study reviews the Joseph Rowntree Foundation’s 'Making Change Happen' programme, which provided a year’s funding to four grassroots development organisations with a track record in providing support to black disabled people. The report sets out the learning that emerged from the four development projects.

Children caring for themselves and child neglect: when do they overlap?

For some families leaving a child alone is a necessity because of lack of other options. For others it is a symptom of parental neglect. Understanding the differences between these situations is a challenge for child protective services agencies. This is the report of a study to examine how local child welfare agencies respond when they receive reports of children who are taking care of themselves.

Public Understanding, Expectations and Views about Child Protection in Scotland

The Child Protection Review Team of the Scottish Executive Department commissioned MORI Scotland to conduct a programme of research. The overall aim of this research was to assess levels of public knowledge and understanding of the current child protection processes and within this, look at expectations that the public have about the role of the individual, community and public agency in child protection and the degree to which each should take responsibility or become involved.

Disabled parents : examining research assumptions

This review seeks to bring a somewhat hidden issue into the light, examining it and considering how the knowledge identified here might influence the future direction of services. Parenting as such has, rightly, gained increasing prominence over the last few years – but the parenting support needs of disabled parents have been largely ignored. This review was developed with two aims in mind. First, to bring together the research literature on disabled parents and, second, to set that research within the context of the policy and practice thinking of its time.