social policy

Policy document which sets out the government's objectives for social policy to improve the lives of Scottish people in collaboration with the public, private and voluntary sectors, local government and the UK Government.

The document sets out achievements and targets in the following: justice, education and lifelong learning, health and community care, environment, transport, drugs and finance.

Britain’s Poorest Children Revisited focuses on the experience of severe and persistent child poverty in the UK during the period 1994- 2002. The report begins by examining trends in childhood experience of severe and non-severe poverty between 1994 and 2002, with particular reference to changes after 1997, when new policies were introduced to address the problem of child poverty in the UK.

This resource - Getting it right together on learning disabilities, has been written for all pre-registration nursing students in Scotland. It comprises five units of study that will support something in the order of 12 to 15 hours of directed and, or, facilitated learning on a range of issues that relate to learning disabilities. Unit 3 looks at the history of learning disabilities.

This short report provides an overview of Choosing Health, the Government’s recent public health White Paper, from a public mental health perspective. It aims to identify both the gaps and opportunities in the White Paper and to provide a framework for addressing these.

This episode of Radio 4's Woman's Hour series asks if single parents should have to seek work to get benefits. As the Government launches further pilot projects to encourage lone parents to return to work, Woman's Hour asks whether incentives or sanctions are more effective in getting parents back into the labour market.

David Willets, Shadow Work and Pensions Secretary and Kate Stanley, Head of Social Policy at the Institute for Public Policy Research discuss whether lone parents with secondary school aged children should have to seek work in order to claim benefits.

This review directly addresses the practical implications of multiprofessional and multiagency working on the front line. It draws messages from a diffuse range of literature spanning organisational theories, research and practice to offer guidance to practitioners, team leaders and educators. While relating the evidence to historical, theoretical and current policy contexts, it retains a primary interest in the day-to-day experience of professionals in social care, education, health and other areas, and in trying to improve the outcomes for vulnerable children and families.

IHRA is the leading organisation in promoting evidence based harm reduction policies and practices on a global basis for all psychoactive substances (including illicit drugs, tobacco and alcohol).

This resource looks at the UK education system. On January 15th 2004 a dozen film crews from the BBC in Bristol went out across the length and breadth of the country to capture a day in the life of education. Each crew followed a single person over their normal day.

In this episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series, following the interview with Sociologist James Stockinger in September 2004, Professor Peter Nolan talks to Laurie Taylor on the uniqueness of the British the public sector ethos and finds out why its employees, despite being the most motivated, are the most demoralised sector of the workforce. This segment is second of three discussions in the audio clip.

This study reviews the Joseph Rowntree Foundation’s 'Making Change Happen' programme, which provided a year’s funding to four grassroots development organisations with a track record in providing support to black disabled people. The report sets out the learning that emerged from the four development projects.