social policy

Basic income, social justice and freedom

On 11 March 2009, the Joseph Rowntree Foundation hosted a symposium on Basic income, social justice and freedom, jointly organised with the University of York's School of Politics, Economics and Philosophy. Based on themes from the work of eminent political philosopher Philippe Van Parijs, it discussed his argument for the introduction of a basic income paid unconditionally, without work requirements or means tests.

Time and income poverty (summary report)

Time and money are two key constraints on what people can achieve. The income constraint is widely recognised by policy-makers and social scientists in their concern with poverty. Proposed solutions often focus on getting people into paid work, but this risks ignoring the demands people may have on their time. This study looks at individuals who are significantly limited by time and income constraints: those who could escape income poverty only by incurring time poverty, or vice versa.

Europe: What does it mean for the fight against poverty in Scotland?

The European Union exerts a powerful influence over our lives, but few anti-poverty organisations take an active role in influencing what the EU does. This briefing highlights the role of the EU in relation to social policy, and how organisations can get involved.

Family housing (Radio 4 series: Woman's Hour)

This episode of Radio 4's Woman's Hour series looks at whether new legislation will address the problem of overcrowded family accommodation. A new Housing Bill is about to become law. One of the most significant changes it will make is a redefinition of overcrowding in family homes.

Criminal policy transfer (Radio 4 series: Thinking Allowed)

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes a segment on criminal policy transfer in view of criminals who increasingly operate across national boundaries and so apparently do ideas of criminal justice.

Laurie Taylor talks to criminologist, Professor Tim Newburn, and considers the claim that crime control policies here and in the United States are converging. The segment is second in the audio clip after a look at economies of design.

Disabled children and childcare (Radio 4 series: Woman's Hour)

This episode of Radio 4's Woman's Hour series looks at the widening wealth gap under the Labour Government. More than half of families with disabled children live on the margins of poverty; just 16 percent of mothers with disabled children work, compared with 61 percent of other mothers; and childminders and nurseries geared to providing facilities for disabled children are scarce. With the Government setting targets to tackle child poverty,

Expectations and aspirations: public attitudes towards social care

This briefing is the first output from the ippr-PwC social care programme. This programme seeks to generate public debate about the future of social care; and consider how the social contract between the state, organisations, communities, families and individuals may need to fundamentally change to ensure that the future of social care is based on principles of fairness and sustainability. This publication it's free, in order to download there are two ways to do it, by registering or just by following the link to download it.

Workforce Planning Toolkit

This toolkit aims to provide guidance and tools to help you develop your own workforce plan.

Single parents (Radio 4 series: Woman's Hour)

This episode of Radio 4's Woman's Hour series asks if single parents should have to seek work to get benefits. As the Government launches further pilot projects to encourage lone parents to return to work, Woman's Hour asks whether incentives or sanctions are more effective in getting parents back into the labour market.

David Willets, Shadow Work and Pensions Secretary and Kate Stanley, Head of Social Policy at the Institute for Public Policy Research discuss whether lone parents with secondary school aged children should have to seek work in order to claim benefits.

School Day

This resource looks at the UK education system. On January 15th 2004 a dozen film crews from the BBC in Bristol went out across the length and breadth of the country to capture a day in the life of education. Each crew followed a single person over their normal day.