social policy

ScotCen Social Research: research

Research resources on a range of social policy areas. Topics include children, schools and families; crime and justice; social inclusion; health and lifestyle; and income and welfare.

Report 60: Safeguarding adults: multi-agency policy and procedure for the West Midlands

This resource reflects the commitment of organisations in the West Midlands and allied local authorities to work together to safeguard adults at risk. The policy and procedures are aimed at different agencies and individuals involved in safeguarding adults, including managers, professionals, volunteers and staff working in public, voluntary and private sector organisations. Resource published by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) in July 2012. Review date July 2015.

An examination of parity principles in welfare and wider social policy

Paper that explores the operation of the parity principle in Northern Ireland (NI), drawing on experiences of Scotland. Issues considered include the background to the ‘parity principle’ in NI and other examples where it has been identified as an issue, an exploration of the range of arguments articulated as to the implications of breaking parity with GB, how the implications vary depending on the specific policy areas in question, and the likely outcomes of breaking parity in relation to measures included in the Welfare Reform Bill (Northern Ireland) 2012.

Why we need to create a 'Nice for social policy'

Paper that outlines why there is a need to explore the need for a centre – or a network of evidence centres – which will help to institutionalise evidence in the decision making process.

National social report 2012

Report that outlines the current economic and social situation in the UK, highlighting the challenges the UK faces in meeting the objectives of the Open Method of Coordination for social protection and social inclusion. The report goes on to set out the UK Government’s and devolved authorities’ responses to these challenges.

Monitoring poverty and social exclusion 2011

This report comes at a time when the UK government has outlined its main policy intentions and its strategy to reduce poverty. Although the statistics presented in this report still almost entirely reflect the policies of the previous government, the Labour record is the Coalition inheritance.

This commentary discusses the implications of that record for the current government in the light of its commitments on child poverty and social mobility set out in strategy documents published in 2011.

List of EPPI-Centre systematic reviews

This page provides the full list of EPPI-Centre systematic reviews. Systematic reviews aim to find as much as possible of the research relevant to the particular research questions, and use explicit methods to identify what can reliably be said on the basis of these studies.

Challenge Question: How will we know if our child poverty strategy delivers joined up services for the people and places which need them most?

Child Poverty challenge question postcards for Strategic leaders published by the Centre for Excellence and Outcomes in Children and Young People’s Services (C4EO) in 2010. This downloadable postcard present challenge questions from C4EO’s research. The questions act as checklists to stimulate multi-agency thinking and help you develop your Child Poverty strategy and practice. There are questions for strategic leaders in children’s services, housing professionals, health professionals and frontline practitioners.

Response to the Treasury Committee Inquiry on the Spending Review

Response to the Treasury Committee Inquiry on the Spending Review 'To inform Treasury Committee's inquiry on decision-making and other aspects of the recent Spending Review'.

Community and mutual ownership: a historical review

This report surveys the history of ‘community and mutual ownership’ and considers the implications for policy and practice in this area. Policy-makers have identified that community and mutual ownership can make a significant contribution to the economy, welfare and society more generally. A historical analysis of social change can inform contemporary understanding, policy and practice.