government policy

'Living Well with Dementia' sets out the government’s strategy for helping people with dementia and their carers over the next five years. Its aim is to ensure that significant improvements are made to dementia services across three key areas: awareness and understanding; earlier diagnosis and intervention; and quality of care. This briefing summarises the key points of the strategy, covering in greater depth elements which are relevant to the housing sector.

Analytical discussion paper providing a framework for understanding the family, pinpoint how it has changed and, taking into account the evidence, stating the principles guiding the UK Government's family policy.

This consultation will help to prioritise actions as a result of the recommendations and gauge the response to activity.

Attached to this document is a table that shows the draft presented by the Scottish Government as response to each of the recommendations from either the UN Committee or domestic NGOs and the Children’s Commissioner.

Information on the advice given to local authorities in 2003 from the Scottish Government.

The guidelines include the rights and responsibilities of pupils and parents.

Document setting out the Scottish Government's strategic approach to tackling alcohol misuse in Scotland.

The measures proposed include specific legislative action intended to bring about short term change and more general measures aimed at effecting cultural change in the long term.

Joint statement by the leaders of the Scottish Labour Party and the Scottish Liberal Democrats for the improvement and development of public services in the areas of education; justice; enterprise; transport and health in the joint new government from May 2003.

This report asks why cost-effective analysis is useful in the field, considers it in relation to other evaluations, and discusses depression treatment, intervention for child and adolescent mental health problems, hospital closure and helping decision makers connect with the evidence, ending with recommendations on stakeholder relevance, expanding the evidence base, expanding and adapting existing evidence, methodological challenges and improving linkages and exchange between research and policy-making.

Report inquiring into why the proportion of children living in poverty has risen in a majority of the world's developed economies over the past decade. It seeks to identify the factors pushing poverty rates upwards and why some OECD countries are doing a better job than others in protecting children at risk.

This report from the Social Justice Policy Group, chaired by Iain Duncan Smith, identifies five 'pathways' to poverty and makes proposals for tackling them. These pathways are: educational failure, family breakdown, economic dependence, indebtedness and addictions. A sixth section considers how the third sector might be better supported to help people escape poverty.

In 1998 Labour made significant reforms to the youth justice system. A decade later these have failed to reduce offending. This report proposes ways in which the youth justice system could reduce offending, as well as ways of creating public confidence in the system. Contents include: why we need a new approach to youth justice; a tale of two targets - why a new approach is needed; objectives, barriers to, and new principles of youth justice; can a new direction be preventative?; will the public support popular preventionism?