government policy

Domestic abuse: a draft training strategy

The focus of this draft strategy is on identifying training and development activity required to support improvement in services to women and children who are experiencing domestic abuse, and to men who use violence.

It is based on increasing capacity to deliver training and providing national co-ordination of training on domestic abuse. This training strategy is set out in 6 sections: context, aims of the training strategy; requirements of the training strategy; taking the strategy forward; capacity building; and an action plan.

Valuing young people: principles and connections to support young people achieve their potential

Paper developed with input and advice from a range of partners who deliver for young people. It is set out in 3 sections: context, common principles, and connections.

It is intended as a practical resource for anyone making decisions that affect the support we give young people or anyone involved in delivering services to them. It can provide a point of common reference and a tool for making connections.

The road to recovery: one year on

One year ago the Scottish Government launched Scotland’s first drugs strategy since devolution. Central to the strategy was a new approach to tackling problem drug use based firmly on the concept of recovery. The action set out in the strategy reflects that tackling drug use requires action across a broad range of areas. This progress report takes the same approach.

Support and Services for Parents: A Review of the Literature in Engaging and Supporting Parents

Literature review published by the Scottish Government which draws together existing knowledge on assessing and evaluating parenting interventions. In conducting the literature review, the research team was interested in re-examining the historical policy context to locate the rationale for the introduction of Parenting Orders and the apparent under use of the provisions and the evidence of risk and protective factors and the interrelated issues of antisocial behaviour and child care, alongside effective approaches to family service provision.

Scottish Executive's annual report on drug misuse

Second annual report which sets out the progress made in 2002 across all 4 pillars of the Executive’s drugs strategy, namely, young people, communities, treatment and availability.

New arrangements for Connexions/careers services for young people in England

Report of a survey looking at the impact of new arrangements for careers and related services for young people in England whereby responsibility for managing such services passed from Connexions Partnerships to local authorities.

Safe. sensible. social: the next steps in the National Alcohol Strategy

UK Government document reviewing progress since the publication of the Alcohol Harm Reduction Strategy for England (2004) and outlining further action to achieve long-term reductions in alcohol-related ill health and crime.

Locked out : the prevalence and impact of housing & homelessness problems amongst young people, and the impact of good advice

Report examining the scale and the effects of homelessness problems amongst young people and concluding that the legal aid system has failed to meet young people's needs for specialist advice and government could do more to address young people's homelessness needs.

The state of social care in England 2007-08

Report describing trends in the range, quality and availability of social care services in 2007-08 across the public, voluntary and private sectors and examining support to people with multiple and complex needs to establish whether these people are benefiting from the new personalised care agenda as described in 'Putting people first'

Bringing it home : community-based approaches to counter-terrorism

Paper arguing that local communities are well placed to be an integral part of counter-terrorism activities. It contends that communities can be important sources of information and intelligence, can act to divert young people from extremism, can take the lead in tackling problems which cause grievances and fully legitimise the work of police and security services by consenting to their activities.