local authorities

Supporting disabled adults as parents

Effective support for disabled parents is still rare, though many local authorities are beginning to recognise its importance. The National Family and Parenting Institute researched how supportive practice could be improved by talking to disabled parents and visiting four local authorities that are developing work in this area.

Gypsies/Travellers in Scotland: the twice yearly count No. 15 January 2009

In July 1998, the former Scottish Executive introduced a series of twice yearly counts of this population (undertaken in January and July) to establish standardised and consistent estimates across Scotland. The purpose of the count is to better understand the characteristics of this population and to assist and inform the development of public policies and services for Gypsies/Travellers, both nationally and locally.

Contracting for personalised outcomes: learning from emerging practice

This report draws on the learning from six councils and shows how they have begun to change their approach to contracting, service development and provider relationships to be more compatible with the aims of personalisation and personal budgets. It provides a summary of the main components of the contractual models identified (personal budgets, service personalisation and outcomes focused framework contracts), a framework for understanding the relationship between them and a brief account of the key messages from the case studies.

Options for care funding: What could be done now?

Many experts, the public and the Government agree that the UK needs a new care funding system: evidence shows that the present system is unfair, unclear and unsustainable. This summary updates a Solutions produced in 2007, and suggests four costed, fairer and more sustainable methods of funding.

Criminal justice social work statistics, 2008-09

Statistical bulletin that presents national level information on activity relating to community penalties in Scotland, derived from Local Authority Social Work management information systems. It provides information on various aspects of criminal justice social work such as Social Enquiry Reports (SERs), Community Service Orders (CSOs) and Probation Orders (POs).

Healthy children, safer communities: a strategy to promote the health and well-being of children and young people in contact with the youth justice system

This cross government document aims to help tackle youth crime and anti-social behaviour, and contribute to community safety in England. It sets out a strategic approach to inform the work of the Healthy Children, Safer Communities programme board to fulfil the vision that children and young people will be safer, healthier and stay away from crime.

Services for adults with autistic spectrum conditions (ASC): good practice advice for primary care trust and local authority commissioners

This publication builds on current guidance, and highlights existing information and good practice for commissioners in primary care trusts and local authorities who have responsibility for commissioning services for adults with autistic spectrum disorders. It aim is to ensure that commissioners enable, empower and promote independence and meaningful choices for adults with autistic spectrum.

Councils adapt ICS to unlock its potential

The authors, from Dorset Council, explain how they are trying to get the best out of the Integrated Children's System despite its limitations. The ICS was intended to enable a single consistent approach to case-based information gathering, case planning, case aggregation and case reviews. As such, the easily generated and clear reports would help social workers collect, organise, analyse and retrieve information.

Looked-after children: third report of session 2008-09: volume II: oral and written evidence

Provides the detailed oral and written evidence presented to the Children, Schools and Families Select Committee session on looked after children. The session aimed to investigate the performance of the care system in England, consider whether the Governments proposals for reform were soundly based, and to find out whether the Care Matters programme would be effective in helping looked after children. A summary of the findings are provided in Volume I.

Good practice guidance for children in care councils

The Government's decision to provide all children and young people with the opportunity to participate fully in decisions that affect them is to be welcomed. It should give Local Authorities the opportunity to develop the appropriate methods of communication that participants need to engage fully in the Children in Care Councils. Children in Care Councils have the potential to contribute to transforming the lives of those involved, providing that children and young people are given the correct platform to share and discuss their views.