economics

This report forms part of SCIE’s wider work on economics. It presents SCIE’s position on how economic evaluations should be undertaken, and the results used, to inform decision-making in the social care sector.

Briefing paper which examines the challenges to economic policy, and to employers, some of whom are already experiencing labour shortages, which will increase with the retirement of the large age cohorts born in the 1940s and 1950s.

This report examines what being part of the global economy means for people living in poverty, focusing on experiences of the 2009–2010 recession. It identifies areas where welfare reform is necessary to protect poorer people from a more volatile world economy. Report published by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation in March 2011.

In April 2004 the Office of Health Economics and the Mental Health Foundation held a seminar focusing on the economics of childhood and adolescent mental health as part of their commitment to improving mental health provision for children and young people in the UK. This report is an attempt to draw together the themes from the discussions, along with general conclusions from the day.

This working paper reviews the evidence on the impact of the last three economic recessions on the PSA 8 (indicator 2) disadvantaged groups (that is, disabled people, ethnic minorities, lone parents, people aged 50 and over, the 15 per cent lowest qualified, and those living in the most deprived local authority wards), as well as ex-offenders and the self-employed.

An introduction gives the history of how in most European countries for many decades large institutions dominated provision for people with severe and chronic disabilities, including those with mental health problems, and how this changed. Trends in the balance of care, changes in provision, and policies to develop community care and the allocation of resources are described, challenges listed and opportunities outlined, ending with a conclusion that research on progress in this area in Europe has been limited.

The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) is the UK's leading research funding and training agency addressing economic and social concerns. They aim to provide high quality research on issues of importance to business, the public sector and government.

This working paper forms part of the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) Economics of Migration project. It looks at how Polish migrants have increasingly used social networks to find employment in the UK. Although this has allowed them to maintain high employment rates it brings a risk that migrants will be "locked in" to low-skilled jobs and less integrated into the wider economy and society. The integration policy agenda is currently focused on long term settlement but many migrants only come to the UK for a short period of time.

National Statistics is a quality marker applied to certain of the United Kingdom's official statistics. Statistics labelled as 'National Statistics' must meet certain criteria. They should, for example, be fit for purpose, methodologically sound, politically independent and transparently produced. All National Statistics are produced in accordance with the Framework for National Statistics and comply with the principles embodied in the National Statistics Code of Practice. They are reviewed every five years for quality.

Joint statement by the leaders of the Scottish Labour Party and the Scottish Liberal Democrats for the improvement and development of public services in the areas of education; justice; enterprise; transport and health in the joint new government from May 2003.