central government

The Disability Equality Duty has now been in place for four years. It provides a framework for promoting equality, addressing disability discrimination and tackling the barriers and prejudice that disabled people experience. This report demonstrates the progress we are making in our journey towards full disability equality.

The aims of this project were to use case studies of companies, to obtain a better understanding of the links between employers’ product markets strategies and the demand for skills. It sought to identify the conditions and constraints in which firms’ product market strategies affect skills utilisation, and explore the potential implications for public policy.

This research was commissioned by the Scottish Government as part of Better Together Scotland’s Patient Experience Programme. The objectives of this work were to establish a hierarchy of issues important to Scottish patients receiving hospital inpatient care and to test for differences in priorities among demographic groups. The results could then be used to inform the development of tools to measure inpatient experiences across Scotland.

The Skills Utilisation Action Group presents this report on the inspection of the assessment and management offenders who present a high risk of serious harm by Social Work Inspection Agency (SWIA), HM Inspectorate of Constabulary for Scotland (HMICS) and HM Inspectorate of Prisons (HMIP).

Jointly commissioned report by the Scottish Government and Glasgow City Council of the Independent Inquiry into Abuse at Kerelaw Residential School and Secure Unit.

Pamphlet arguing that public sector efficiency can only be achieved through creating more effective services which are personalised and delivered collaboratively. It also provides guidance on how this can be done.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is an important longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond.

The study is funded by the Scottish Government and carried out by the Scottish Centre for Social Research (ScotCen). Its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

The Mental Health (Care and Treatment) (Scotland) Act 2003 was passed by the Scottish Parliament on 20 March 2003 and came into force in October 2005. It was clear from the ongoing monitoring to which the Act was subject that there were some areas in which problems were being experienced. Accordingly, the Scottish Government decided to institute a limited review of the Act.

Following the launch of the Scottish Government’s new policy and action plan for mental health improvement (MHI) for 2009-11, Towards a Mentally Flourishing Scotland an event was held to support the implementation. The meeting brought together key national agencies and partners with responsibility for mental health improvement, together with senior officials from the Scottish Government, local government and the NHS.

Paper examining the concept of agility and what it might mean for government. It looks at the characteristics of agile organisations and how these might translate to the public sector environment. It argues that government must become more agile in order to respond to changing citizen needs.