parents

This rapid review was undertaken to examine the effectiveness of behavioural interventions for sleep problems in young disabled children (up to age eight years), specifically interventions that can be carried out by parents in the home. Nineteen studies were identified, four were RCTs and 15 were before and after studies, most of which had less than 10 participants. Three of the four RCTs had been conducted in a UK setting.

Report exploring the everyday life of the 'hard-working family'. It uses original research and existing data to frame a new agenda for debate on family life, one based on the premise that it is in the public interest to recognise and strengthen the relationships between families, state and civil society.

Report of the Steer Review of standards of pupil behaviour in schools in England. The report presents the conclusions of the review and makes forty-seven recommendations grouped under the themes of legal powers and duties, supporting the development of good behaviour and raising standards higher.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is an important longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond.

The study is funded by the Scottish Government and carried out by the Scottish Centre for Social Research (ScotCen). Its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

This is episode 1 in a series in which Mariella Frostrup and guests, Sue Gerhardt, Stephen Scott and Jennie Bristow, discuss whether shouting at children causes long-term damage, or is an unavoidable part of busy family life. Possible effective alternatives are discussed.

Literature review providing a synthesis of the existing empirical evidence about the ways in which children and families signal their need for help, how these signals are recognised and responded to and asking whether response could be quicker.

This resource examines the reasons for listening to children which includes that it acknowledges their right to be listened to and for their views and experiences to be taken seriously about matters that affect them. Listening can make a difference to our understanding of children’s priorities, interests and concerns and can make a difference to our understanding of how children feel about themselves. This resource highlights that listening is a vital part of establishing respectful relationships with the children we work with and that it is central to the learning process.

Video demonstrating the impact on children and their family when a parent is arrested and the ways in which social care services can help them.

The literature review sought to identify relevant findings, evidence and discussion in the literature on GRT pupils and their parents, from 1997 onwards. The review draws on UK material with the inclusion of selected European sources. The findings of the review are summarised according to key themes, including: attitudes; expectations; aspirations; relationships; parental involvement; attendance and mobility; behaviour; achievement.

Report of an evaluation of an outreach service which aimed to assess the effectiveness of the service, describe the particular approach being used and pinpoint ways in which the findings can be applied to other services working with children and families affected by substance use.