parents

This qualitative study explored mainstream parent-practitioner consultations and the influence of personal experience and diversity factors. The research examined the perspectives of 54 practitioners working within education, health and social care.

Report describing a paediatric telemedicine project which was established to facilitate rapid diagnosis of children with cardiac or surgical problems at a distant centre. The project involved installing mobile video conferencing units in ten sites throughout Scotland along with a video conferencing room at the Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Glasgow.

This review examines the available research about both the impact of problem drug use and interventions designed to reduce that impact. It starts by looking at definitions, the extent of problem drug use, and its impact across important aspects of children’s lives. The review is intended for social care workers involved with adults – using or affected by drugs – and their children and young relatives.

Not all families affected by substance misuse will experience difficulties. However, parental substance misuse may have significant and damaging consequences for children. These children are entitled to help, support and protection, within their own families wherever possible. Sometimes they will need agencies to take prompt action to secure their safety. Parents too will need strong support to tackle and overcome their problems and promote their children’s full potential.

This resource discusses the benefits of being listened to as a child and how what we learn about ourselves from the adults closest to us depends on the quality of our experience with them. This in turn affects how our self-esteem and sense of identity develops.

This resource vividly describes the situation of many children and young people living in substance misusing households.

The children's hearings system, Scotland's unique system of juvenile justice, commenced operating on 15 April 1971. The system is centred on the welfare of the child. A fundamental principle is that the needs of the child should be the key test and that children who offend and children who are in need of care and protection should be dealt with in the same system. Cases relating to children who may require compulsory measures of intervention are considered by an independent panel of trained lay people.

Literature review published by the Scottish Government which draws together existing knowledge on assessing and evaluating parenting interventions. In conducting the literature review, the research team was interested in re-examining the historical policy context to locate the rationale for the introduction of Parenting Orders and the apparent under use of the provisions and the evidence of risk and protective factors and the interrelated issues of antisocial behaviour and child care, alongside effective approaches to family service provision.

Report of an evaluation of the Camelon, Larbert and Grangemouth Support to Parents (CLASP) Project which set out to discover any potential weaknesses in the service and make recommendations for improvement.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is a longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond. Funded by the Scottish Executive Education Department, its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.