families, children and young people

Challenge Question: How will we know if our child poverty strategy delivers joined up services for the people and places which need them most?

Child Poverty challenge question postcards for Strategic leaders published by the Centre for Excellence and Outcomes in Children and Young People’s Services (C4EO) in 2010. This downloadable postcard present challenge questions from C4EO’s research. The questions act as checklists to stimulate multi-agency thinking and help you develop your Child Poverty strategy and practice. There are questions for strategic leaders in children’s services, housing professionals, health professionals and frontline practitioners.

Challenge question: how can we help tackle child poverty – our main business is housing and tenancy issues?

Child Poverty challenge question postcards on housing published by Centre for Excellence and Outcomes in Children and Young People’s Services (C4EO). This downloadable postcard present challenge questions from C4EO’s research. The questions act as checklists to stimulate multi-agency thinking and help you develop your Child Poverty strategy and practice. There are questions for strategic leaders in children’s services, housing professionals, health professionals and frontline practitioners.

Challenge question: How can our work improve the health of children, young people and families living in poverty? How can this be reflected in health strategies?

Child Poverty challenge question postcards on health published by Centre for Excellence and Outcomes in Children's and Young People's Services (C4EO). This downloadable postcard present challenge questions from C4EO’s research. The questions act as checklists to stimulate multi-agency thinking and help you develop your Child Poverty strategy and practice. There are questions for strategic leaders in children’s services, housing professionals, health professionals and frontline practitioners.

Men in families and family policy in a changing world

Publication which has been financed by the United Nations Trust Fund on Family Activities, and provides funding support for research activities with an overall aim of promoting the objectives of the International Year of the Family. The five independent chapters were commissioned to focus on a number of relevant current international issues affecting families and the role of men in addressing them.

Family and friends care: a guide to good practice for local authorities

Urgent action is required at national and local level in order that clear policies and systems are in place in every local authority to ensure that family and friends care arrangements are appropriately assessed and supported.

This good practice guide has been developed to assist local authorities in this task. It is informed by:

· Examples of good practice found in policies sent by local authorities in response to the FOI survey.

Freedom of information survey of local authority policies on family and friends care

In 2007 Family Rights Group sent a questionnaire to all local authorities in England and Wales, under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 specifically about family and friends care.

It asked each authority to provide its policies for working with, assessing and supporting family and friends carers and the children they are raising, information on dedicated staffing and data on the numbers of children and carers assisted by legal order and budget spent (see Appendix A for the Freedom of Information questions sent to all local authorities in England and Wales).