families, children and young people

The Common Assessment Framework (CAF) is a standardised approach for the assessment of children and their families, to facilitate the early identification of additional needs and to promote a coordinated service response.

The study aims to explore the impact of the CAF on both children and families and professionals, and examines how far a ‘bottom up’ cost calculation methodology could be extended to include the costs of the Common Assessment Framework.

Research shows that poor maternal mental health and low income during babyhood affect children's outcomes negatively and are factors in the creation of future generations of "Troubled Families". Early intervention services to improve children's life chances must therefore mean intervening before at-risk babies are born, and in the first year of life; providing both services which support vulnerable mothers emotionally and with parenting; and providing adequate welfare support.

Document which is part of a series that summarises key findings from the sixth sweep of the study, which was collected in 2010/11 when children in the birth cohort were aged almost 6 years old.

It is one of two summaries which presents key findings from the Growing Up in Scotland study report 'Early experiences of Primary School'.

Childhood obesity and low physical activity both have serious implications for children’s health. This report had twin objectives: to explore determinants of both obesity and low physical activity in young children. Included in the investigation of obesity is an assessment of whether it is linked to low physical activity.

The report also examined the extent to which mothers were aware of their child being overweight or obese and whether they were concerned by this.

The overall aim of this report is to provide a more nuanced understanding of variation in grandparental support to grandchildren and their parents over a child’s early years in Scotland.

Report that provides a best estimate of the extent of reductions in public funding that the children’s voluntary sector can expect to see over the next five years. It takes the debate beyond the cuts, and, based on consultation with NCB’s network members, explores how children’s charities are responding and adapting to austerity measures and the barriers they face to doing so.

Finally, it offers recommendations for what can be done to ensure that children, young people and families – and the statutory sector – can continue to benefit from a thriving charity sector.

In April 2011, Resolution Foundation started following seven low to middle income families across England to track their financial and economic position and how their lives changed over the course of 12 months.

This report summarises their experiences over the year and the key challenges faced by the families.

Research by advice charity Family Rights Group, and Oxford University’s Centre for Family Law and Policy, which includes: a survey of more than 490 carers; 95 in-depth interviews; a government analysis survey and a Freedom of Information request.

Report that looks purely at family-based interventions that are specifically targeted towards families with drug and alcohol misuse problems. Family-based interventions include those that work with the whole family, the parent and the child and the examples referred to and the recommendations made should be considered only in relation to drugs and alcohol.

Report that offers new evidence from more than 30 case studies, showing that even for children and families with much more complex needs, including those on the edge of care, it is still possible to achieve significant improvements in outcomes in a very cost-effective way by intervening appropriately once the families‟ needs have come to the attention of practitioners.