young people

A Centre for Research on Families and Relationships web resource containing a series of briefing papers on the subjects of parental alcohol problems, young people's views of services, children's mental health, sexual health, quality of life, domestic and other violence, relationships, and other children's and families issues.

The second Virtual Violence study, Beatbullying’s large-scale, in-depth study of cyberbullying among children, young people and teachers in the UK. The research builds on the first Virtual Violence study conducted in 2009 and adds valuable depth to our understanding of cyberbullying.

Such research allows us to measure the extent and impact of the problem in order to shape appropriate solutions; the findings of this report will help to map the changing landscape of digital aggression, progress made and what still remains to be done.

Despite increasing concern about youth unemployment, there has been little work to date focused on identifying those at risk of becoming NEET (Not in employment, education or training) and the evidence base on intervention programs that can make a difference.

Research that aimed to investigate the nature and extent of youth homelessness in England, and specifically to find out:

Report that gives insight into the lives of a group of 18 young people from Northern Ireland during a period of profound economic, social and political change, from the mid- to late-1990s to 2010.

The young people featured in this study were part of a larger, long-term project and this study draws on their biographies and shows the impact of youth-relevant policies on real lives. It also identifies gaps and weaknesses in policies and service delivery.

Report on homophobia and transphobia carried out in South Yorkshire that represents a collaborative piece of work between Sheffield Hallam University, Chilypep and the Centre for HIV and Sexual Health.

Early findings from the Children's Society's third national survey of young runaways, 2011.

The main aims of the survey were:
1. To provide up-to-date findings on rates and experiences of running away comparable with the two previous surveys conducted in 1999 and 2005
2. To provide new insights into the links between running away and other aspects of children’s lives, through the exploration of issues not covered in previous surveys, such as family change and subjective well-being.

Paper that analyses the relationship between having one or more father figures and the likelihood that young people engage in delinquent criminal behaviour. It pays particular attention to distinguishing the roles of residential and non-residential, biological fathers as well as stepfathers.

The Smith Group (the Group) has been active since 2005, advising and guiding Ministers in successive administrations on education policy, enterprise in education and youth employment issues. The composition of the group is its strength, bringing together leading figures in business and education to bring fresh perspective to what is at once a challenge and an opportunity - how Scotland can best prepare its young people to make effective contributions in their adult lives.