pregnancy

Pregnancy

This page contains the findings of systematic reviews undertaken by the EPPI-Centre Health Promotion and Public Health Reviews Reviews Facility. This topic is included in the EPPI-Centre knowledge library. The Knowledge Pages facility enables users to search for the key messages within specific subject areas to which EPPI-Centre reviews have contributed.

Smoking cessation programmes in pregnancy : systematically addressing development, implementation, women’s concerns and effectiveness

This review discusses the effects of smoking cessation programmes for pregnant women and how relevant they are to women’s concerns. This systematic review was published by EPPI-Centre in 2004. Systematic reviews aim to find as much as possible of the research relevant to the particular research questions, and use explicit methods to identify what can reliably be said on the basis of these studies.

Improving maternal and infant nutrition: a framework for action

The Scottish Government wants to ensure that all children have the best possible start to life, are ready to succeed and live longer, healthier lives.

To help achieve this, an Infant Nutrition Framework for Action has been developed, which is aimed at a wide variety of organisations with a role in improving maternal and infant nutrition in Scotland.

The fathers of children born to teenage mothers: a study of processes within changing family formation practices

The study was funded by The Big Lottery and was conducted on a partnership basis by CHILDREN 1ST (who had overall management responsibility) and the Glasgow Centre for the Child & Society, University of Strathclyde. A final report of the study entitled, 'Fathers of Children Born to Teenage Mothers: A Study of Processes within Changing Family Formation Practices'. The study began in August 2006 and finished in November 2009.

Philosophy of care - a recovery focus

Pre-course reading handout for the STRADA one-day module, Substance Misuse in Pregnancy.

Substance use during pregnancy: time for policy to catch up with research

The purpose of this review is to summarize policy research findings in the area of maternal prenatal substance abuse to (1) inform and advance this field, (2) identify future research needs, (3) inform policy making and (4) identify implications for policy. As a review, this is a systematic analysis of existing data (findings) on maternal drug use during pregnancy for determining the best policy among the alternatives for dealing with drug using mothers and their children.

'Planned' teenage pregnancy: Views and experiences of young people from poor and disadvantaged backgrounds

This in-depth study explores the motivations for ‘planned’ teenage pregnancy in England. The findings have important implications for the Teenage Pregnancy Strategy and the increasing political agenda on young people and health. The report is based on 51 in-depth interviews, undertaken among teenagers in six relatively disadvantaged locations who reported their pregnancy as 'planned' (41 women and 10 men).

The Adolescent Brain: A Work in Progress

This paper summarises scientific research about brain development in adolescence and in particular, emphasises the changes to the prefrontal cortex of the frontal lobes which appear to be especially critical for mature decision making and impulse control. Sections within the paper address changes in the brain during adolescence at the cellular level; describes adolescent brain development from the perspective of new techniques now available for studying living brains; and, in the final section, summarises knowledge about how these brain changes may affect thinking and behaviour.

A woman's guide to epilepsy

Leaflet whose purpose is to support women with epilepsy by giving them a better understanding of their condition. It offers information and advice on matters which may affect women in their lives such as contraception, family planning, pregnancy and motherhood.

Growing up in Scotland: pregnancy, birth and early parenting

Parents’ expectations and experiences of pregnancy, birth and the first few months of parenting are presented as part of the Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond.