parenting

This qualitative study, which draws on focus group discussions and interviews, captures the views of Bangladeshi Muslim, Pakistani Muslim, Gujarati Hindu and Punjabi Sikh fathers and mothers. The findings suggest that policies aimed at supporting Asian fathers appreciate and address a number of issues.

Presents new evidence on the damaging effects of neglect and the challenges of dealing with the issue, as told by the professionals in a position to spot the early warning signs – before more serious concerns are reported to the police or social workers. It paints a worrying picture from the frontline of the signs and consequences of child neglect as seen in nurseries, primary schools, hospitals and in local communities across the UK.

Four Radio 4 programmes in a series about the health and wellbeing of the seven ages of humanity, presented by Connie St Louis. These four programmes explore the adult years of 20-40.

The first programme looks at how the fully formed body functions, the second discusses sex and relationships, the third examines mental health in early adulthood, and the final programme discusses lifestyle and keeping active.

This document was published as part of the National Service Framework (NSF) for Children and Maternity Services document. This case studies is an exemplar of a child with complex disability.

This document was written by the Department of Health. The National Service Framework for Children, Young People and Maternity Services establishes clear standards for promoting the health and well-being of children and young people and for providing high quality services that meet their needs.

This document is based on two resources: Working Together to Safeguard Children: a guide to inter-agency working to safeguard and promote the welfare of children; and the Framework for the Assessment of Children in Need and their Families. Working Together sets out how all agencies and professionals should work together to safeguard and promote children’s welfare and the Assessment Framework outlines a framework for use by all those who work with children and families determining whether a child is in need under the Children Act 1989 and deciding how best to provide help.

Episode 3 of this series in which Mariella Frostrup and guests, Christine Tufnell, Penny Mansfield, Nick Woodall and Elly Farmer, explore step-parenting and 'blended families' from the point of view of parents, children and society.

This report sets out a framework for the assessment of children in need and their families involving cooperation from all agencies who have a role in protecting children in society.

The government's expectations of how this framework will be used are also laid out. The guidance has been produced primarily for the use of professionals and other staff who will be involved in undertaking assessments of children in need and their families under the Children Act 1989.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is an important longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond.

The study is funded by the Scottish Government and carried out by the Scottish Centre for Social Research (ScotCen). Its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

This study examined parenting during early and middle childhood within different social and cultural groups in Britain, using a ‘parenting score’ derived from different measurements of parents’ relationships with their children. The study was based on parents’ reports of attitudes, feelings and behaviour recorded in response to specific questions relating to parenting. The study also assessed changes in parenting across time.