parenting

What Works for Children

'What Works for Children?' has produced summaries of research evidence on some specific interventions, called Evidence Nuggets. The nuggets present the available evidence on specific interventions covering: cognitive behaviour therapy; mentoring; parenting; home visiting; breakfast clubs; traffic calming.

Impact of family breakdown on children's well-being: evidence review

This review investigates the impact of parental separation and divorce on children’s well-being and development. The review incorporates evidence concerning family breakdown, and its consequences, in the context of understandings of ‘the family’, ‘breakdown’ and the ‘well-being’ of children and young people, and includes research relating to both married and cohabiting parents. ‘Well-being’ is defined as incorporating children’s mental, emotional and physical health.

Youth Taskforce - progress report

Report outlining the progress being made by the Youth Taskforce, an agency set up by the Department for Children, Schools and Families to improve outcomes for some of the most at risk and challenging young people in England. The report features case studies involving the Taskforce and includes ideas for good practice.

Parenting and children's resilience in disadvantaged communities

This resource suggests that there has been relatively little research about the distinctive challenges of bringing up children in disadvantaged areas, nor of children’s perspectives on identifying and managing threats. In particular, it highlights that little is known about how parents and children promote their children’s well-being and safeguard them from day-to-day risks.

The other glass ceiling : the domestic politics of parenting

Report exploring the everyday life of the 'hard-working family'. It uses original research and existing data to frame a new agenda for debate on family life, one based on the premise that it is in the public interest to recognise and strengthen the relationships between families, state and civil society.

Growing up in Scotland (GUS): non-resident parent summary report

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is an important longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond.

The study is funded by the Scottish Government and carried out by the Scottish Centre for Social Research (ScotCen). Its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

Bringing up Britain (BBC Radio 4 series)

This is episode 1 in a series in which Mariella Frostrup and guests, Sue Gerhardt, Stephen Scott and Jennie Bristow, discuss whether shouting at children causes long-term damage, or is an unavoidable part of busy family life. Possible effective alternatives are discussed.

Listening as a way of life : why and how we listen to young children

This resource examines the reasons for listening to children which includes that it acknowledges their right to be listened to and for their views and experiences to be taken seriously about matters that affect them. Listening can make a difference to our understanding of children’s priorities, interests and concerns and can make a difference to our understanding of how children feel about themselves. This resource highlights that listening is a vital part of establishing respectful relationships with the children we work with and that it is central to the learning process.

Practice guidance on assessing the support needs of adoptive families

Guidance prepared for practitioners in England who are involved in assessing the support needs of people affected by adoption. It is based on the child-centred model laid out in the Framework for the Assessment of Children in Need and their Families.

Religion, beliefs and parenting practices

Little is known about the influences of religious beliefs and practices on parenting adolescents. Yet religious beliefs and practices have the potential to profoundly influence many aspects of life, including approaches to parenting. This is particularly relevant with increasing diversity of religious affiliations in contemporary British society.