parenting

Four Radio 4 programmes in a series about the health and wellbeing of the seven ages of humanity, presented by Connie St Louis. These four programmes explore the teenage years. The first programme looks at the hormonal changes that are the hallmark of the teenage years, the second looks at teenage behaviour and the third at how adolescents relate to those around them. The final programme of the series looks at the later stages of adolescence.

Guidance prepared for practitioners in England who are involved in assessing the support needs of people affected by adoption. It is based on the child-centred model laid out in the Framework for the Assessment of Children in Need and their Families.

Little is known about the influences of religious beliefs and practices on parenting adolescents. Yet religious beliefs and practices have the potential to profoundly influence many aspects of life, including approaches to parenting. This is particularly relevant with increasing diversity of religious affiliations in contemporary British society.

All of us who work with families carry into our work a whole set of beliefs and values about family life and how children should be cared for. This learning object is designed to make you aware of these personal values and how they might impact on your practice. This learning object explores the way that personal values can effect the way you deal with families and seeks to help make practitioners aware of the impact and implications that this can have. You will be asked to capture your initial thoughts relating to 3 case study images depicting different aspects of family life.

This resource is one of the units on the Open University's OpenLearn website, which provides free and open educational resources for learners and educators around the world. This unit explores the ways in which difference and diversity impact on the nature of communication in health and social care services. Interpersonal communication in health and social care services is by its nature diverse.

A study, by the Scottish Social Services Learning Network North and the Aberdeen Foyer, of the experiences of young people seeking advice and support with sexual health, pregnancy, and parenthood in Aberdeen.

It is now increasingly understood that there are different types of knowledge, all of which contribute to the ability of members of the children's workforce to do their jobs well. Understanding the types of knowledge that are available, and having access to this knowledge is an important aspect for anybody who is working with families that are living in poverty.

This episode of Radio 4's You and Yours series looks at different views on the diagnosis of ADHD in children. Tens of thousands of children in the UK are given powerful drugs to calm them down. Leo Mckinstry, writer for The Spectator is one of the many who suspect that we are making an illness out of ordinary childhood behaviour and creating problems of hyperactivity by confining children in their homes.

Policy-makers and commentators often blame ‘bad parenting’ for children and young people’s troublesome behaviour. What can research tell us about the influence of parenting, especially the parent-child relationships in millions of ‘ordinary’ families? This report includes research based on the perspectives of mothers, fathers and children themselves. They were commissioned by the JRF to inform its own Parenting Research and Development programme.