parenting

This episode of Radio 4's Woman's Hour series looks at why drug addiction is on the increase. The number of women taking drugs has always lagged behind the number of men, but research shows that the ratio of girls to boys aged just 11 who've admitted using drugs is roughly the same. It's also claimed that the number of children placed on the child protection register because their parents have a drugs problem now exceeds those children listed because their parents drink.

Parenting has increasingly become the focus for policy and academic debate. The racial and cultural heterogeneity of British society also invites considerable attention to many aspects of the lives of minority ethnic families. Yet, there is little empirical evidence into ethnicity, parenting and family life. This study, by Ravinder Barn at Royal Holloway, University of London, explores the views and experiences of 'ordinary' parents to increase our understanding in some key areas, including family support, education, child discipline and the process of acculturation.

There is increasing enthusiasm, both in government and in the community, for improving child outcomes through parenting programmes. This drive encompasses the ‘Surestart’ and ‘Respect’ agendas, and emphasises the importance of children’s centres and school-based support. However, many programmes have failed to work when rigorously tested. This study examines factors which influence programme effectiveness in poor, ethnically diverse areas.

Listening to children is an integral part of understanding what they are feeling and what it is they need from their early years experience. Understanding listening in this way is key to providing an environment in which all children feel confident, safe and powerful, ensuring they have the time and space to express themselves in whatever form suits them. This resource refers to listeners as adults and looks specifically at listening to babies.

This report has been produced under the auspices of the Scottish Child Care and Protection Network (SCCPN). SCCPN aims to increase access to and use of research evidence in practice. The review has been undertaken in response to practitioners who have requested more information on what makes for best practice in working with families where parental substance misuse is a factor. It has also been undertaken in response to a brief set out by the Scottish Government (2008) in The Road to Recovery, the most recent strategy on drugs.

This document was published as part of the National Service Framework (NSF) for Children and Maternity Services document. And represents an example of a child with autism and learning difficulties.

A survey of 1,496 parents and carers was carried out between August and October 2008 to quantify the reach (i.e. awareness and usage) of Sure Start Children’s Centres among the target population (that is, parents and carers of children aged under five years and expectant parents). The survey was limited to children’s centres which were designated by March 2006 and so had been established for several years.

This podcast is part of the Social Work and Health Inequalities Research Seminar Series. In this podcast Norma Baldwin talks about the economic, social and cultural contexts of parenting.

Christine Puckering is Consultant Clinical Psychologist at the Royal Hospital for Sick Children in Glasgow. She is qualified in clinical, forensic and neuropsychology and developed the Mellow Parenting Programme. She chaired the recent HeadsUpScotland Infant Mental Health Review and has provided infant mental health consultancy across the world.

Report presenting the findings of a follow-up study to support the implementation of the National Institute for Clinical Excellence/Social Care Institute for Excellence guidance on parenting programmes. It also provides some background to the study and reviews what is already known about the factors which increase the likelihood of uptake and completion of parenting programmes.