parenting

Report of an evaluation of the Parent Know How programme which was set up to deliver better outcomes for children and parents by generating greater efficiency, innovation and reach in the parenting information and support services funded by the Department for Children, Schools and Families.

This episode of Radio 4's Woman's Hour series looks at the 100,000 children under 16 living in the UK who run away from home. We hear from a woman whose twelve year old daughter persistently ran away and was frequently returned to the family home by the police. Jill Colbert from the Safe in the City project in Salford - who works with young runaways - and John Wheeler from Childline will be joining Jenni Murray to discuss the difficulties that parents of runaways can face in accessing help.

For some families leaving a child alone is a necessity because of lack of other options. For others it is a symptom of parental neglect. Understanding the differences between these situations is a challenge for child protective services agencies. This is the report of a study to examine how local child welfare agencies respond when they receive reports of children who are taking care of themselves.

This review seeks to bring a somewhat hidden issue into the light, examining it and considering how the knowledge identified here might influence the future direction of services. Parenting as such has, rightly, gained increasing prominence over the last few years – but the parenting support needs of disabled parents have been largely ignored. This review was developed with two aims in mind. First, to bring together the research literature on disabled parents and, second, to set that research within the context of the policy and practice thinking of its time.

This resource is the fourth in a series of lectures designed to honour the memory and achievement of Lord Kilbrandon who wrote one of the most influential policy statements on how a society should deal with 'children in trouble'.

This lecture discusses the influence of a child's formative years on their subsequent adult behaviour and the role of the parent.

This is a case narrative detailing the story of a young child Charlene and her mother Jane, who has a history of inappropriate (sometimes violent) relationships and drug misuse. There are a number of concerns about Charlene who is eventually removed from Jane’s care. This case scenario can be used to illustrate a number of issues, including drug misuse, partnership work, good practice in investigation, and assessment in training contexts.

This publication is a companion volume to the Guidance on the Framework for the Assessment of Children in Need and their Families. It is a significant contribution to a major programme of work led by the Department of Health to provide guidance, practice materials and training resources on assessing children in need and their families.

Harsh Realities looks at how doctors, nurses, social services, and advisers take vital decisions about people's lives. The second programme in the series tackles child disability and the stark choices facing parents and professionals when a baby is born severely disabled. In each programme, Niall Dickson will be joined by professionals who have direct experience of the subject under discussion. In order to listen to this programme select programme 1 for audio access.

Child of Our Time is one of the programmes available on the Open2.net website, which is the online learning portal from the Open University and the BBC. The programme's presenter Robert Winston returns to the children born in the year 2000 to discover how they're developing. The children are now learning right from wrong, discovering about happiness - and, for some, adjusting to no longer being an only child.

The purpose of this consultation paper is to explore how the law relating to the physical punishment of children can be modernised, so that it better protects children from harm. The aim of the consultation is to address two specific issues. First, within the context of a modern family policy, in a responsible society, where should we draw the line as to what physical punishment of children is acceptable within the family setting? Second, how do we achieve that position in law?