parenting

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is an important longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond.

The study is funded by the Scottish Government and carried out by the Scottish Centre for Social Research (ScotCen). Its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

This episode of Radio 4's Woman's Hour series asks if single parents should have to seek work to get benefits. As the Government launches further pilot projects to encourage lone parents to return to work, Woman's Hour asks whether incentives or sanctions are more effective in getting parents back into the labour market.

David Willets, Shadow Work and Pensions Secretary and Kate Stanley, Head of Social Policy at the Institute for Public Policy Research discuss whether lone parents with secondary school aged children should have to seek work in order to claim benefits.

Report that draws on data from the first sweep of the Growing Up in Scotland (GUS) study to examine the extent to which parents with young children have access to, and draw upon, informal sources of support with parenting. That is, support, information and advice which is sought from and provided by family members - including spouses, partners, parents’ siblings and the child’s grandparents - friends, and other parents.

Report giving advice on how to ensure all parents are able to access parent education programmes. It also examines the take-up of parenting programmes and potential barriers to access.

Podcast of a talk by Neil Ballantyne, IRISS, Zachari Duncalf, Scottish Institute for Residential Child Care and Ellen Daly, Connected Practice, given at the Connected Practice Symposium, "Human services in the network society:changes, challenges & opportunities", Institute for Advanced Studies, Glasgow, 14th/15th September 2009.

This resource produced by Down's Syndrome Scotland, provides information for parents on the issues and feelings that siblings of Down's Syndrome children may have.

Report of a study which aimed to explore the transition from care experienced by young people with a view to identifying any differences in the experiences of recent care leavers when compared to older leavers and pinpointing key factors in the transition which impact on life after care.