parenting

Section of the Department for Education website for parents and commissioners looking for parenting programmes and interventions. The programmes have all been independently evaluated using an evidence-based approach to show that they work. Assessments were carried out prior to 1st April 2012.

Report that provides the findings of the evaluation of the early education pilot for disadvantaged two year old children (the pilot).

This study aimed to assess the impact of the pilot by looking at: how well the pilot was targeted, parents’ experiences of taking up a pilot place, the quality of the pilot settings, the impact on the children’s cognitive and sociobehaviour, and parents’ views and experiences of using a pilot place.

Publications page of Parenting across Scotland, which contains research on the importance of early years, and effective approaches to parenting and family support.

Report with a focus on parenting from babyhood to early childhood. It brings together and examines research from a variety of disciplines to address the following questions:

- Why is parenting important in the early years?
- What is good parenting in the early years?
- What are the determinants of parenting in the early years, and is it who you are or what you do that is important?

A growing body of research suggests that good parenting skills and a supportive home learning environment are positively associated with children’s early achievements and wellbeing. Hence interventions to improve the quality of home and family life can increase social mobility.

This briefing looks at how parenting styles affects child development and social mobility.

Conduct disorders are the most common psychiatric disorders in children and may persist into adulthood in about 50% of cases. The costs to society are high and impact many public sector agencies.

Parenting programmes have been shown to positively affect child behaviour, but little is known about their potential long-term cost-effectiveness.

This report estimates the costs of and longer-term savings from evidence-based parenting programmes for the prevention of persistent conduct disorder.

Second edition of book that provides an update on the impact of parental problems, such as substance misuse, domestic violence, learning disability and mental illness, on children’s welfare.

Research, and in particular the biennial overview reports of serious case reviews (Brandon et al 2008; 2009; 2010), have continued to emphasise the importance of understanding and acting on concerns about children’s safety and welfare when living in households where these types of parental problems are present.