parental role

Pre-course reading handout for the STRADA one-day module, Substance Misuse in Pregnancy.

Report that consolidates the key messages from fathers of children with disabilities, and re-contextualises them in a 21st century agenda for development. The platform provided by this report is a sound basis from which professionals and services can re-orientate their practice and service delivery to ensure that fathers are heard, and listened to, their needs embraced and their contribution valued.

The Scottish Schools (Parental Involvement) Act 2006 aimed to improve the way that schools engaged with parents, both individually through parental involvement and collectively through Parent Councils. This report presents the findings of a representative survey of 1,000 parents in Scotland to see whether the new legislation was making a difference by increasing levels of parental involvement and representation.

Study examining the level of parental involvement in middle childhood and concluding that children in middle childhood are more likely to have behaviour problems if they watch more than three hours of TV a day and have low parental involvement.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is an important longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond.

The study is funded by the Scottish Government and carried out by the Scottish Centre for Social Research (ScotCen). Its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is a longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond. Funded by the Scottish Executive Education Department, its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is a longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish. Its aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties. Focusing initially on a cohort of 5,217 children aged 0-1 years old and a cohort of 2,859 children aged 2-3 years old, the first wave of fieldwork began in April 2005.